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Guidance for post graduation in physics

by davegr8
Tags: graduation, guidance, physics
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davegr8
#19
Jul2-11, 12:06 AM
P: 5
okay economics a bit difficult but what about my situation, i had some under grad physics background.
MosesKoul
#20
Jul2-11, 04:07 AM
P: 7
Point Taken.
But is there a possibility of taking up Physics later on in life?
can i enroll for higher physics courses since Physics for me is purely a passion ,not a means to earn a living.
Vanadium 50
#21
Jul2-11, 06:14 AM
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Quote Quote by davegr8 View Post
okay economics a bit difficult but what about my situation, i had some under grad physics background.
Are you going to keep asking this and asking this until you get a different answer?
Mute
#22
Jul2-11, 07:58 AM
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Quote Quote by davegr8 View Post
okay economics a bit difficult but what about my situation, i had some under grad physics background.
An aerospace engineer probably would have an easier time switching to physics because a lot of the courses you have taken will have been physics courses, but you still need to have taken the upper-level core physics courses to really be taken seriously. Classical mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism and Statistical Mechanics are generally the classes you'll be expected to have taken. If you're missing just one of these they might still let you in and let you take the upper-division undergrad class to fill in your gap. If you're missing more than one of the core courses it probably considerably weakens your application.

So, it's not impossible to get in, but remember, your application has to convince a graduate committee that they should pick you over someone who has taken all of the required core courses. In that regard, relevant physics-oriented research and/or a high PGRE score help your case.
Astro_Dude
#23
Jul3-11, 11:35 AM
P: 50
An aerospace engineer probably has the best chance of any of the engineering disciplines in getting in. If only because they are going to have taken a lot more in the way of physics (even if not in pure physics courses) than most engineers. Scoring well on the GRE will go a long way to show you can do the undergad level physics. Another thing I'd suggest is not trying for the top-universities.

IN general, what matters more than anything is what you study and who you study under.. not so much where it is.

Good luck!


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