Register to reply

What's your favorite calculator?

by ArcanaNoir
Tags: calculator, favorite
Share this thread:
SW VandeCarr
#37
Aug4-11, 10:54 PM
P: 2,499
Quote Quote by Ivan92 View Post
The best calculator ever!
I just calculated the 12th root of 2 to 9 places in a fraction of a second on my old TI-30Xa. Can your brain do that?
Integral
#38
Aug4-11, 11:03 PM
Mentor
Integral's Avatar
P: 7,318
Quote Quote by hotvette View Post
I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for my very first calculator - an HP35 I purchased in 1973 for $395. That was a huge amount of money back then but well worth it.
Ha! I bought mine used for $175 in 1973, I also got a lot of use out of it. Right now it is in its hard case in my closet.

My current calculator is a HP 28s. This is the first graphing calculator, on the market in 1986.

Redbelly,
Sorry for the loss of your dad. I too "collected" HP calculators in the '70's . I had the 35, a 25, 33,34, 71b and the 28. I never owned the greatest HP calculator the HP41c.
Jimmy Snyder
#39
Aug4-11, 11:08 PM
P: 2,179
Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
I just calculated the 12th root of 2 to 9 places in a fraction of a second on my old TI-30Xa. Can your brain do that?
1.059463094 I think.
QuarkCharmer
#40
Aug4-11, 11:09 PM
QuarkCharmer's Avatar
P: 1,035
Quote Quote by Jimmy Snyder View Post
1.059463094 I think.
I just memorized this answer so my brain is able to do this next time.
zomgwtf
#41
Aug4-11, 11:47 PM
P: 500
Quote Quote by Integral View Post
Ha! I bought mine used for $175 in 1973, I also got a lot of use out of it. Right now it is in its hard case in my closet.

My current calculator is a HP 28s. This is the first graphing calculator, on the market in 1986.

Redbelly,
Sorry for the loss of your dad. I too "collected" HP calculators in the '70's . I had the 35, a 25, 33,34, 71b and the 28. I never owned the greatest HP calculator the HP41c.
All of these old calculators seem incredibly tedious to operate.
BobG
#42
Aug5-11, 05:50 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
BobG's Avatar
P: 2,280
Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
I just calculated the 12th root of 2 to 9 places in a fraction of a second on my old TI-30Xa. Can your brain do that?
1

My brain was smart enough to remember that your final answer shouldn't have more digits than the original numbers that went into the problem in the first place. Since the square root of 2 is less than 1.5 and I know the answer can't get below 1 no matter how many roots you take, that answer was pretty easy.

Getting 9 digit answers when the numbers in the problem only had 1 significant digit is one of the drawbacks of calculators. Ever since the introduction of electronic calculators, just about every math or science course now needs to start with a chapter about significant digits.
ArcanaNoir
#43
Aug5-11, 06:18 AM
ArcanaNoir's Avatar
P: 753
Quote Quote by BobG View Post
1

My brain was smart enough to remember that your final answer shouldn't have more digits than the original numbers that went into the problem in the first place. Since the square root of 2 is less than 1.5 and I know the answer can't get below 1 no matter how many roots you take, that answer was pretty easy.

Getting 9 digit answers when the numbers in the problem only had 1 significant digit is one of the drawbacks of calculators. Ever since the introduction of electronic calculators, just about every math or science course now needs to start with a chapter about significant digits.
Significant digits only count in science, not in math. Pi goes forever, and so does the square root of two, and every other irrational number. We can take them as far as we like in pure mathematics, regardless of the length of other numbers in a calculation.
SW VandeCarr
#44
Aug5-11, 12:34 PM
P: 2,499
Quote Quote by ArcanaNoir View Post
Significant digits only count in science, not in math. Pi goes forever, and so does the square root of two, and every other irrational number. We can take them as far as we like in pure mathematics, regardless of the length of other numbers in a calculation.
Yes. There's also a practical value to taking the 12th root of 2 to a desired level of precision. It's the constant multiplier of the fundamental frequencies across an "octave" (actually 12, not 8 tones). So taking a base frequency B and using [itex]B*2^{x/12}[/itex] where x is an integer [itex]0\leq x\leq 12[/itex], gives the fundamental frequency of the tones across the "octave".
I like Serena
#45
Aug5-11, 03:37 PM
HW Helper
I like Serena's Avatar
P: 6,187
Quote Quote by ArcanaNoir View Post
Significant digits only count in science, not in math. Pi goes forever, and so does the square root of two, and every other irrational number. We can take them as far as we like in pure mathematics, regardless of the length of other numbers in a calculation.
Exactly, so in pure math we never need a calculator to calculate digits!
*Sigh*
Redbelly98
#46
Aug5-11, 04:48 PM
Mentor
Redbelly98's Avatar
P: 12,069
When pi comes up in mathematics or theoretical physics, it is represented as [itex]\pi[/itex]. In engineering or experimental physics, 3.14 usually suffices. In neither case is an infinite number of digits required.
hotvette
#47
Aug5-11, 07:40 PM
HW Helper
P: 925
Quote Quote by Integral View Post
Ha! I bought mine used for $175 in 1973, I also got a lot of use out of it. Right now it is in its hard case in my closet
Wow, good price. I didn't even consider used. I unfortunately sold mine in 1984 for $5 in a garage sale (including original hard case, leather soft case, charger, and manuals). Big mistake.
glueball8
#48
Aug5-11, 10:10 PM
P: 347
Quote Quote by stringy View Post


Aww you beat me to it...

Thanks to it, I don't know how to solve integrals by myself anymore. ==
Astronuc
#49
Aug6-11, 04:45 PM
Admin
Astronuc's Avatar
P: 21,865
HP-41CX. I bought that during grad school, ca. 1982, and I still have and use it.

Before 1982 I had a TI-SR51 and TI-58C.
zgozvrm
#50
Oct27-11, 10:47 AM
P: 754
I've always been partial to Sharp calculators. The first calculator I ever had was a TI (natch). They were the only ones available when handhelds first came out - they had those awful red LED displays. In college, I found a Sharp EL-512 which was around $30 and was programmable.



That was the beginning of my love affair with Sharp calculators. I have yet to find an inexpensive (< $20) calculator that I like that beats a Sharp. They have plenty of functions and (more importantly) their keyboards are generally laid out better than those of other companies.

Later in college, I found that many of the "rich" students were using HP calculators with RPN. I found those intriguing and ended up buying an HP 32SII (also for around $30).




It, too, is programmable, allowing for much more complex programs (albeit, with greater difficulty). After college, I found a newer Sharp to replace my trusty old EL-512 which had broken. I got an EL-520W for around $20 which has become my new favorite.



It does everything I need (including complex numbers) and even does simple derivatives and integrals.

A co-worker had this horrible Casio calculator that was extremely difficult to use (even for simple calculations). I bought him a Sharp EL-531X which is very similar to my EL-520 (lacking some of the more complicated functions) for $10 at Office Depot.

Greg Bernhardt
#51
Oct27-11, 11:14 AM
Admin
Greg Bernhardt's Avatar
P: 9,474
I used to have that Sharp in the first image zgozvrm! Good times!
jhae2.718
#52
Oct27-11, 05:56 PM
PF Gold
jhae2.718's Avatar
P: 1,153
My calculator:


When I'm not on a computer, I have a Ti-84, though I just bought an HP-50 to replace it.
imabug
#53
Jan20-12, 11:20 PM
P: 345
My HP-28S has been serving me well for the past 23 years and has been my favourite calculator to use. Recently acquired a second one off ebay so that I'd have one for work and for home
S.R
#54
Feb18-12, 09:18 PM
P: 66
Scientific calculator: TI-30XS MultiView™


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Favorite music.. General Discussion 0
Favorite one-hit wonders General Discussion 71
Favorite age General Discussion 18
What's your favorite tea General Discussion 33
What's your favorite... General Discussion 24