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How Oil Is Formed

by wilsonb
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StuffIThink
#19
Aug17-11, 06:22 PM
P: 1
Icthyosaurs that were oceanic dinosaurs.

Probably a few of them turned into oil for sure.
Ophiolite
#20
Aug22-11, 12:15 PM
P: 274
Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
And yet he claims that even "one example" of a deposit containing even "a portion" of dinosaur remains is against current understanding.

Again, I'm not nitpicking here. I'm asking if macrolife decaying and forming a protion of the constituents of oil is simply not at all as we currently understand it.
The wording is that "some oil deposits contain dinosaurs". Perhaps I am too much of a literalist. Decaying organic material, generally microscopic animal life, deposited - as others have noted - in anoxic conditions is converted to kerogen. Such deposits are typically fine grained i.e. clays, which - through diagenesis - will go on to become claystones and shales. The kerogen then undergoes further chemical changes to release oil, which migrates into the oil reservoirs.

General usage would have reserved the phrase 'oil deposits' for these oil reservoirs, not for the source rocks which are, not surprsingly, called source rocks, not oil deposits.

Now it is entirely possible - indeed, I think a virtual certainty - that some of these reservoir rocks containing oil also contain dinosaur remains. But those dinosaurs are not the source of the oil that has migrated there. Equally, the occassional stray dinosaur, washed out to sea and sinking to the bottom where it is buried by a turbidity current deposit, may assuredly contribute its tiny mass to the developing kerogen.

I, however, am unaware of such an event ever having been identified, not because it may not have occured, but because it would exceedingly rare. If it has been documented then I would really like to read about it. Hence I asked for a citation.

for StuffIThink - Icthyosaurs are not dinosaurs.
Studiot
#21
Aug22-11, 12:49 PM
P: 5,462
Icthyosaurs are not dinosaurs.
Someone from nitpickersanonymous.org whispered in my ear

are not?

Where can I meet one? I thought I was the last living dinosaur left on the planet.
Ophiolite
#22
Aug23-11, 08:55 AM
P: 274
Quote Quote by Studiot View Post
Someone from nitpickersanonymous.org whispered in my ear

are not?
Speaking as a former student palaentologist I can assure you that icthyosaurs still are very definitely around and some stunning examples can be see at the Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London. :)
DaveC426913
#23
Aug25-11, 11:35 AM
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Quote Quote by Ophiolite View Post
Speaking as a former student palaentologist I can assure you that icthyosaurs still are very definitely around and some stunning examples can be see at the Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London. :)
Yeah. I think "are" implies "still alive".

You got news about a live ichthyosaur? I'd like to discuss it with you. Meet me in the back alley at midnight. Come alone.
Ophiolite
#24
Aug26-11, 11:54 AM
P: 274
Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
Yeah. I think "are" implies "still alive"..
To normal people, yes, but not to palaeontologists. I mean if they are alive they have all this squishy soft stuff that you have to remove to look at the bones.
DaveC426913
#25
Aug26-11, 12:19 PM
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Quote Quote by Ophiolite View Post
To normal people, yes, but not to palaeontologists. I mean if they are alive they have all this squishy soft stuff that you have to remove to look at the bones.
wondering2
#26
Oct28-11, 12:52 PM
P: 2
I wonder if it is possible for the heat and presure at lower levels in the core can produce "oil" and "natural gas" without the need to bury small or large animals and plants several miles deep?

Just Wondering2
cmb
#27
Oct28-11, 01:00 PM
P: 628
Quote Quote by DoggerDan View Post
While squeezing a lemon the other day, I noticed how oily the results were on my skin, even after a quick rinse. I'd always thought "lemon oil" used on furniture merely referred to the scent, but lemons apparently have a lot of actual oil in them.
In the form D-limonene, it is used [increasingly] as a solvent for other oily substances too, being much safer and environmentally benign than chlorinated hydrocarbons.
cmb
#28
Oct28-11, 01:01 PM
P: 628
Quote Quote by wondering2 View Post
I wonder if it is possible for the heat and presure at lower levels in the core can produce "oil" and "natural gas" without the need to bury small or large animals and plants several miles deep?

Just Wondering2
There is a theory to this effect by a chap called 'Gold' I believe. If I find a link I'll post, but you'll likely have luck searching for 'Abiogenic Petroleum'.
Dotini
#29
Oct28-11, 01:42 PM
PF Gold
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Quote Quote by cmb View Post
a chap called 'Gold'
Thomas Gold, eminent physicist (Cambridge, Harvard, Cornell), wrote "The Deep Hot Biosphere". A very good read.

Respectfully submitted,
Steve
cmb
#30
Oct28-11, 01:49 PM
P: 628
Quote Quote by Dotini View Post
Thomas Gold, imminent physicist...
...I'll be waiting to hear what he has to say, then, once he's a physicist!
Evo
#31
Oct28-11, 01:50 PM
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Quote Quote by cmb View Post
There is a theory to this effect by a chap called 'Gold' I believe. If I find a link I'll post, but you'll likely have luck searching for 'Abiogenic Petroleum'.
To my knowledge the abiogenic oil hypothesis isn't accepted.

Abiogenic petroleum origin is a largely abandoned hypothesis that was proposed as an alternative to theory of biological petroleum origin.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiogenic_petroleum_origin
Dotini
#32
Oct28-11, 02:14 PM
PF Gold
P: 506
Quote Quote by cmb View Post
...I'll be waiting to hear what he has to say, then, once he's a physicist!
Thanks for so tactfully pointing out my spelling error. I have corrected it.

I have in my hand a carbonaceous chondrite, which I would like to throw at you.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonaceous_chondrite

As for hearing what Gold has to say, you're a little late, since he died in 2004.

Respectfully,
Steve
cmb
#33
Oct28-11, 02:21 PM
P: 628
(Sorry, Dotini, I could not resist that one!)
cmb
#34
Oct28-11, 02:27 PM
P: 628
So, just as an aside on this - a story line to some sci-fi story, maybe!...


Lovelock (Gia fame) has proposed what sounds to me like the only really practical way for carbon capture. This is to turn trees into charcoal (thus getting a little energy out of them to make it worth while) and then burying it.

As far as I can tell, this is the most practical way of doing it, so if we are going to do it, then, on the basis that the most practical things come to pass eventualy, then that'll eventually happen.

The 'story line', then, is that the coal we have today is the past attempt at carbon capture, by this method, of a civilization who left it too late to clean up their carbon emissions!
Evo
#35
Oct28-11, 02:28 PM
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Crackpot conspiracy theories having to do with abiogenic oil are abundant on the internet.

Here's a paper on it.

http://static.scribd.com/docs/j79lhbgbjbqrb.pdf
cmb
#36
Oct28-11, 02:38 PM
P: 628
Actually, I am not sure that it is correct to say that abiotic oil formation is all crackpottery. It is beyond imagination that, somewhere, there are just the right conditions for hydrocarbons to form. After all, we find such a vast range of other materials of awe-inspiring unlikeliness that this seems almost inevitable.

The key is the issue of commercially available. I am confident that any 'reserves' that are exploited by humans is from biogenesis. I'd guess that hydrocarbons from 'abiotic' sources are in such small quantities that it is likely implausible to distinguish them from biological contaminations. (Maybe I'll be corrected on that assumption?)


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