Japan earthquake - contamination & consequences outside Fukushima NPP


by jlduh
Tags: consequences, contamination, earthquake, fukushima, japan, nuclear
Bodge
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#415
Nov1-11, 08:38 PM
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The science ministry is saying that the 40 millisievert source is buried radium-226.

Why would someone keep burying this around Setagaya?

I imagine it is expensive stuff?
Astronuc
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#416
Nov1-11, 08:58 PM
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Quote Quote by Bodge View Post
Where has the Silver come from?

Neutron capture by silver-109 from the reactors?

Is silver in the control rods?
Silver is a fission product. Silver is used in PWR control rods in Silver (Ag) - Indium (In) - Cadmium (Cd) or AIC control rod. BWRs typical use B4C and possibly Hf, depending on the control blade design, and the neutron absorbers are cladding in high purity (and low Co) 304 stainless steel.
Marita
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#417
Nov2-11, 02:06 AM
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Quote Quote by Bodge View Post
The science ministry is saying that the 40 millisievert source is buried radium-226.

Why would someone keep burying this around Setagaya?

I imagine it is expensive stuff?


Just a guess but during WW2 there was a lot of "Cottage Industry" in Japan , maybe there were some Radium Dial painting going on in those areas and the "Vials" were just lost at the end of the war and wound up buried where they are found today. But I think if they were leftovers from the war they would have pretty much decayed to lower levels by now.

I don't think the war remains is very likely but I also don't think there is some deranged Radium Vial planter going about hiding them in random locations either. It would be nice to see some information on the history of the locations where there were found. Japan has enough to contend with without these "hot spots" popping up randomly.
Shinjukusam
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#418
Nov2-11, 02:23 AM
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Quote Quote by Marita View Post
But I think if they were leftovers from the war they would have pretty much decayed to lower levels by now.
Well, the half-life of R226 is 1601 years; the war wasn't that long ago.
zapperzero
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#419
Nov2-11, 03:19 AM
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Quote Quote by Marita View Post
It would be nice to see some information on the history of the locations where there were found. Japan has enough to contend with without these "hot spots" popping up randomly.
Setagaya-ku is where Aum Shinrikyo was based for some years. I can't think of anything else.
Shinjukusam
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#420
Nov2-11, 03:29 AM
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Quote Quote by zapperzero View Post
Setagaya-ku is where Aum Shinrikyo was based for some years. I can't think of anything else.
Well, it's also the most populated (1st or 2nd) of the 23 wards of Tokyo, so there is a whole lot that took place there. I don't think it would be related to Aum, they tended to go for much quicker acting methods...
joewein
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#421
Nov2-11, 04:27 AM
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Quote Quote by Bodge View Post
The science ministry is saying that the 40 millisievert source is buried radium-226.

Why would someone keep burying this around Setagaya?

I imagine it is expensive stuff?
Its use really declined from the 1950s. That turned an asset into a liability.

Parts of Setagaya still had a more rural character then. Even now the Tokyo University of Agriculture has a major campus here, with fields and greenhouses.

Setagaya is relatively affluent, so there may be more than a few families that owned industrial companies that might have used radium in the past. Also, higher incomes may lead to a higher rate of possession of dosimeters, hence a better chance of detection of such hotspots than elsewhere.
tsutsuji
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#422
Nov2-11, 07:55 AM
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Tokyo:
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/affairs/new...8280015-n1.htm [Setagaya] Inside the bottle there is a brown color solid believed to be radium 226. Because the radiation was 2 mSv/h after removing the bottle, it is feared that the earth is polluted by things such as scattered glass. Removal work will be continued on 3 November. As a result of a new survey performed today, 8 μSv/h was found in the supermarket's selling space. It is believed that there are multiple radiation sources. Until now only the 110 μSv/h spot near shop entrance was dug. The 170 μSv/h spot near the concrete block wall will be dug in turn.

http://mainichi.jp/select/jiken/news...40041000c.html The bottle is broken. Some earth was removed together with the bottle. Radioactive substances and glass are remaining. Radiations will be further lowered by removing more earth. An 8 μSv/h spot and a 12 μSv/h spot were found close to the digging place. A 2 μSv/h one was also found on the street on the western side of the supermarket premises.

http://news.tv-asahi.co.jp/ann/news/...211102021.html video of the digging.
Martin Peters
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#423
Nov2-11, 09:09 PM
P: 3
Quote Quote by tsutsuji View Post
Tokyo:
http://sankei.jp.msn.com/affairs/new...8280015-n1.htm [Setagaya] Inside the bottle there is a brown color solid believed to be radium 226. Because the radiation was 2 mSv/h after removing the bottle, it is feared that the earth is polluted by things such as scattered glass. Removal work will be continued on 3 November. As a result of a new survey performed today, 8 μSv/h was found in the supermarket's selling space. It is believed that there are multiple radiation sources. Until now only the 110 μSv/h spot near shop entrance was dug. The 170 μSv/h spot near the concrete block wall will be dug in turn.

http://mainichi.jp/select/jiken/news...40041000c.html The bottle is broken. Some earth was removed together with the bottle. Radioactive substances and glass are remaining. Radiations will be further lowered by removing more earth. An 8 μSv/h spot and a 12 μSv/h spot were found close to the digging place. A 2 μSv/h one was also found on the street on the western side of the supermarket premises.

http://news.tv-asahi.co.jp/ann/news/...211102021.html video of the digging.
Is the level of radiation of the soil, glass shards, and other debris left in the hole after the bottle and it's brown contents were removed really 2 MILLI Sv/HR? This is not an inadvertent slip of the wrong "m"?
rowmag
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#424
Nov2-11, 09:16 PM
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Quote Quote by Martin Peters View Post
Is the level of radiation of the soil, glass shards, and other debris left in the hole after the bottle and it's brown contents were removed really 2 MILLI Sv/HR? This is not an inadvertent slip of the wrong "m"?
No obvious typo.
It was 110 micro-Sv/h measured on the surface before they started digging down.
The bottle (which had no cap) was 40 mSv/h.
2 mSv/h was what remained in the dirt after removing the bottle.
tsutsuji
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#425
Nov3-11, 05:12 AM
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http://www.asahi.com/national/update...111020803.html After removing the bottle, the 40 mSv/h (one mili is ten micro) dropped to 2 mSv/h. After removing earth and scattered glass from the surroundings, it further dropped to 25 μSv/h. The bottle has an about 10 cm diameter and an about 30 cm height. It is broken and was put together with the adhering earth in a special sealed container. It does not bear any label, but looks rather old.

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...695301000.html (with video) in a 50 m range around the supermarket, 15 new hotspots were found. The highest one is a 12 μSv/h on the parking lot. The radiation at 1 m above these 15 spots is not much higher than normal, but the ministry of education and science put sandbags on some of them as a radiation shielding countermeasure. A detailed investigation of the 15 new spots is currently being discussed.
nikkkom
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#426
Nov3-11, 06:08 PM
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Quote Quote by tsutsuji View Post
After removing the bottle, the 40 mSv/h (one mili is ten micro) dropped to 2 mSv/h.
"one mili is ten micro"??!
joewein
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#427
Nov3-11, 09:12 PM
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Quote Quote by nikkkom View Post
"one mili is ten micro"??!
That's a mistake, maybe by automated translation.

Japanese:
毎時約40ミリシーベルト(1ミリは1000マイクロ)
English:
40 millisievert per hour (1 milli is 1000 micro)
NUCENG
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#428
Nov4-11, 12:43 AM
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I am not trying to stifle this discussion, but the bottle is clearly not related to the Earthquake or Fukushima. Should this be a new thread?
tsutsuji
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#429
Nov4-11, 06:46 AM
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Quote Quote by tsutsuji View Post
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...111020803.html After removing the bottle, the 40 mSv/h (one mili is ten one thousand micro) dropped to 2 mSv/h.
It was a human mistake. Thanks Joewein for the correction. I don't mind moving talks on contamination unrelated to Fukushima to other threads.
nikkkom
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#430
Nov4-11, 06:02 PM
P: 551
It is somewhat related since this bottle wouldn't be found without large-scale dosimetric campaign induced by Fukushima disaster. How many more wonderful discoveries await us?
tsutsuji
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#431
Nov5-11, 06:27 AM
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Japan:
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/genpatsu-...nko_eikyo.html During a conference in Hamamatsu, nuclear accident minister Goshi Hosono said that he would build up a specialist team, whose mission will be to examine the effects on health of low radiations of the order of 20 mSv/year.

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...622731000.html The Ministry of health's food safety commission held a meeting on 31 October. The provisional food safety levels will be revised with the goal of setting the maximum food exposure at 1 mSv/year from next April (instead of the present 5 mSv/year). Each food's new safety level will be decided within this year.

http://www.tokyo-np.co.jp/article/na...102000163.html The food safety commission received a report that considered that health effects can happen if the accumulated dose of internal exposure over one's life is 100 mSv or above. The maximum 1 mSv/year level for cesium was decided using references such as those of the codex alimentarius. 887, or 6% of the 14,536 food tests performed from July to September in Japan except Fukushima prefecture were above 100 Bq/kg (10% for Fukushima prefecture).

http://www.jiji.com/jc/c?g=soc_30&k=2011110300274 According to the ministry of Agriculture, there are 7200 tons of contaminated straw in 8 prefectures. If it is above 8000 Bq/kg it must be stored in special temporary storage facilities, but most of it is still stored on each farmer's land, as securing such storage space is a time consuming effort.

Tokyo:
http://www.asahi.com/national/update...111020738.html 0.01111 Bq/m³ of strontium 90 was measured in a 15 March air sample taken in Tokyo, Setagaya ward and reported to the Tokyo metropolis administration on 21 June.

Kanagawa:
http://www.jiji.com/jc/c?g=soc_30&k=2011110400425 12 Bq/kg of strontium 90 was measured in an earth sample, Zushi city announced on 4 November. The laboratory that made the measurement says it is reasonable to believe it came from Fukushima Daiichi.

http://news.kanaloco.jp/localnews/article/1111050004/ At Maioka park, Yokohama, 955 Bq/kg was found in shiitake mushrooms harvested and dried in October, and 2770 Bq/kg in those harvested in March and dried in April. 1.8 kg of the March harvest have been served in dishes.

http://mainichi.jp/area/kanagawa/new...40258000c.html 510 Bq/kg was found in tea grown in Yugawara, Kanagawa prefecture announced on 2 November. A tea shipment ban had been in force in 10 towns and villages since June, but in 9 of them, tests have always been below the 500 Bq/limit. The ban has been lifted in those 9 towns and villages except in Manazuru.

Chiba:
http://water-news.info/2103.html Ichihara Ecocement (Ichihara city) was ordered by the prefecture to stop effluents above 1000 Bq/kg flowing into Tokyo Bay, and the plant was stopped on 1 November. 1103 Bq/kg had been measured on 21 September and 1054 Bq/kg on 14 October.

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/chi...OYT8T00065.htm The prefecture took 5 seawater samples in Tokyo Bay up to 2 km away from the cement plant and announced on 4 November that no radiation had been detected.

http://www.chibanippo.co.jp/cn/news/national/63980 Fish samples will be tested to address the concerns of the nearby fish angling park which receives up to 300 visitors per day.

http://www.chibanippo.co.jp/cn/news/local/63749 A detailed survey of the Kashiwa Nedo district hotspot (the 270,000 Bq/kg one) was started on 2 November. Workers measured the surroundings' topography and took 20 earth samples. Sediment samples were also taken in the Ohorigawa river and in the Teganuma marsh. The results are expected for the end of November.

Ibaraki:
http://mytown.asahi.com/ibaraki/news...00001111040004 & http://mytown.asahi.com/ibaraki/news...00001111050002 A citizen group found 122,800 Bq/kg in a 6 October earth and sand sample from a concrete path between the main gate and the children building entrance in a school in Ryugasaki city. The city cleaned the path on 14 October, but samples taken near the path on 3 November had 11720 ~19050 Bq/kg (above the 8000 bq/kg standard that requires waterproofing and shielding measures). 228 locations in schools are above the city's 0.23 μSv/h standard. The mayor said "I have a child too. I will launch countermeasures not only as mayor but also as a parent".

http://mainichi.jp/area/ibaraki/news...40121000c.html The Tsukubamirai school board has decided not to serve to children the 7 kg of fresh shiitake mushrooms that had been planned for a 4 November school lunch menu. They had been harvested on 1 November in a farm's green house in Tsukubamirai city, and tested for radiation on 2 November, and 89 Bq/kg was found. The school board does not have a precise standard, but explains that it wants "to appease the parent's anxiety". Tsukubamirai city has two school lunch cooking centers. The school lunch food ingredients have been checked for radiations since the beginning of October and this is the first time that radioactive substances are detected.

http://mainichi.jp/area/ibaraki/news...40124000c.html Shiitake mushrooms grown outdoors in Omitama and Namegata had respectively 520 and 650 Bq/kg, Ibaraki prefecture announced on 2 November. The shipment ban issued in mid October is going on.

Tochigi:
http://mainichi.jp/area/tochigi/news...40183000c.html 1850 Bq/kg was found in kuritake mushrooms grown in Yaita city.

Gunma:
http://mainichi.jp/area/gunma/news/2...40095000c.html 3.3 Bq/kg found in raw milk from Naganohara village. The milk from Kawaba was below detection level (0.2 ~ 0.4 Bq/kg).

Niigata:
http://mainichi.jp/area/niigata/news...40248000c.html 24 prefectoral high schools etc. were checked and 19 hotspots of 0.31 ~ 1.1 μSv/h were found. The mud removed in one location had 50,000 Bq/kg . All 119 prefectoral middle and high schools will be checked by the end of this month.

Fukushima:
http://www.kfb.co.jp/news/index.cgi?n=201111052 The turnips, spinach and cabbages grown in Hosono and Kawauchi outside the planned evacuation zone can be distributed again, as the test results have been below detection level for 3 consecutive times. Turnips are allowed in the whole Fukushima prefecture, but in the central region, there is a requirement to remove leaves. The test results concerning 32 food products in 38 cities and villages released by the prefecture on 4 November were all below detection level or below the provisional safety limit.

http://www.yomidr.yomiuri.co.jp/page.jsp?id=49699 7% of babies and preschool children below 7 years old in Minamisoma have radiations in urines. The results that were announced cover 1532 children. It is the first part of a survey that will ultimately concern 3500 children. 93% are below the 20 Bq/l detection limit. The highest was 187 Bq/l. The accumulated doses over 70 years were calculated for all of the 104 children with radiations. 93 children between 20 and 30 Bq/l have a 0.054 ~0.058 mSv dose. The child with 187 Bq/l has 0.37 mSv.

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...753271000.html The young children urine test is a response to the complaint that the internal exposure surveys conducted so far by Fukushima prefecture etc. have been checking only the older children who are able to keep a position in a "special equipment".

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/fuk...OYT8T00092.htm The dried kaki test results are 530 Bq/kg in Fukushima, 570 and 1230 Bq/kg in Minamisoma, which brings to 5 the number of cities or villages having a dried kaki shipment ban.
NUCENG
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#432
Nov5-11, 05:05 PM
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Quote Quote by nikkkom View Post
It is somewhat related since this bottle wouldn't be found without large-scale dosimetric campaign induced by Fukushima disaster. How many more wonderful discoveries await us?
Oky Doky! At least here in the US, improper disposal of hazardous waste is already a criminal offense. From descriptions this is an old bottle. It will be difficult to find the person responsible, so after it is removed and cleaned up what lessons are to be learned and what will be done differently? If they find unexploded ordinance left over from WWII while searching for hotspots is that somehow related to Fukushima, the earthquake, or the tsunami? But if you believe this is linked to the accident, then go ahead and discuss it here. I'll admit, it is an interesting discovery that could happen in any country. So I would read it whether it is here or in a separate thread.


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