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Can pneumatic lines be laid under ground

by RKD89
Tags: ground, laid, lines, pneumatic
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RKD89
#1
Nov8-11, 11:03 PM
P: 45
Hi
I noticed that certain workers were laying Pneumatic lines underground ( the lines will be covered with concrete) in a factory.
I have no idea how much the pressure would be , or what safety precautions they are undertaking.
The lines are used to power certain pneumatic tools ( Torque guns ).
Is it possible to do that?
What if there are any leakages?
Is it a malpractice?
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DaveC426913
#2
Nov8-11, 11:09 PM
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Quote Quote by RKD89 View Post
Hi
I noticed that certain workers were laying Pneumatic lines underground ( the lines will be covered with concrete) in a factory.
I have no idea how much the pressure would be , or what safety precautions they are undertaking.
The lines are used to power certain pneumatic tools ( Torque guns ).
Is it possible to do that?
What if there are any leakages?
Is it a malpractice?
I don't see why it would be a problem but I am not knowledgeable of such things.

It's not the same thing but it is common to embed pex pipe in concrete floors to run water through for heating.
xxChrisxx
#3
Nov9-11, 02:33 AM
P: 2,048
It's not very practical if there is a leak, but they would likely be pressure tested before being set in.

Why do you think it would be malpractice?

RKD89
#4
Nov9-11, 03:53 AM
P: 45
Can pneumatic lines be laid under ground

Well, for one I have never seen pneumatic lines under ground.
But I guess it won't be so bad, air is not flammable , and we have gas lines underground.

Still feels awkward though .
Q_Goest
#5
Nov9-11, 06:33 AM
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There are tens of thousands of miles of underground natural gas, hydrogen gas and liquified gas pipelines in the US and throughout the world. Underground and under concrete gasseous piping is very common, even for flammable gas.
DaveC426913
#6
Nov9-11, 08:50 AM
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Quote Quote by xxChrisxx View Post
It's not very practical if there is a leak, but they would likely be pressure tested before being set in.
Well, the nice thing about embedding it in concrete is that you won't get leaks. It's immune to disturbance, wear or anything else that might spawn a leak.
RKD89
#7
Nov9-11, 08:57 AM
P: 45
Thanks Guys..........I was being Naive I guess
gulfcoastfella
#8
Nov11-11, 06:33 AM
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Not naive, just learning...


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