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Video of my marine biology work

by brandon429
Tags: biology, marine, video, work
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brandon429
#19
Nov29-09, 10:21 PM
P: 37
yes I have but they are no good. lol

what I do with regular frequency is drum karaoke however. On each side of the fireplace there are two fifteen inch club drivers from yamaha on a PA amp. You can blend in any instrument track from the guitars or the drums on top of an mp3, then you shape it and equalize the whole patch livetime as it comes out the speakers. This allows you to sonically insert your instrumet into the song as it's being played back, for ultimate timing practice and overall skill required to match tune with pre recorded work. I know some guitarists who can follow songs perfectly and Id like to aspire to that.
brandon429
#20
Nov29-09, 10:33 PM
P: 37
an intersting tie to marine biology as well, sonic sensitization. When new coral frags are added to the bowl, extremely loud live music makes them close up obviously in reaction to this new sonic situation. In about a month they do not ever close up unless you move the bowl, they are truly used to the shaking and sometimes I play for two hours continuously (with ear plugs of course for marathon jams) but the corals will be fully expanded this always amazed me in terms of physical adaptations.
ViewsofMars
#21
Dec8-09, 10:07 PM
P: 463
Quote Quote by brandon429 View Post
yes I have but they are no good. lol

what I do with regular frequency is drum karaoke however. On each side of the fireplace there are two fifteen inch club drivers from yamaha on a PA amp. You can blend in any instrument track from the guitars or the drums on top of an mp3, then you shape it and equalize the whole patch livetime as it comes out the speakers. This allows you to sonically insert your instrumet into the song as it's being played back, for ultimate timing practice and overall skill required to match tune with pre recorded work. I know some guitarists who can follow songs perfectly and Id like to aspire to that.
I wish you the best life has to offer. I have many friends that play musical instruments, and sing too. How can you be sure your songs are no good? Would you mind sharing the lyrics to one of your songs so I can determine if it is good enough to possibly turn into a record? :) Either way, I would enjoy hearing your music. Be a sport. Sock it to us! I have my reasons. I would really like to hear what you are playing for your "coral" audience.

Quote Quote by brandon429 View Post
an intersting tie to marine biology as well, sonic sensitization. When new coral frags are added to the bowl, extremely loud live music makes them close up obviously in reaction to this new sonic situation. In about a month they do not ever close up unless you move the bowl, they are truly used to the shaking and sometimes I play for two hours continuously (with ear plugs of course for marathon jams) but the corals will be fully expanded this always amazed me in terms of physical adaptations.
Normally, from what I understand it is impossible for an aquarist to duplicate the wave energy needed for corals. However, the good news seems to me that your music may also be contributing to their mortality . Check it out...
Sound is also a type of wave that we cannot see. Like ocean waves, sound waves something to travel through like waves through the ocean or through a flag. Sound can travel through air because air is made of molecules. These molecules carry the sound waves by bumping into each other, like dominoes knocking each other over. Sound can travel through anything made of molecules - even water! http://science.hq.nasa.gov/kids/imagers/ems/waves.html
brandon429
#22
Dec8-09, 11:50 PM
P: 37
thanks for discussing music I don't get that enough in reef forums and they are uniquely conjoined in my life apparently :) thats great if you are into music or music arrangement via pc.

the reason I said that about my songs is because all drummers eventually consider the guitar and the early transition is disappointing usually except for dave grohl

Regarding the sensitization, im not sure how the sound pressure waves would convert in water but I would assume it to be deafening as the solid material of the reef resonates. I often wear earplugs to prevent damage but the water would filter out much above 2000hz id suspect, but it would transmit well the 20hz stuff which is the shaker freq's

The observation was based on the fact new-entry corals close up regardless of the form of sound involved, but after weeks don't close during loud jam sessions. This involves some pathway for perception and reaction, and this is interesting in an otherwise gelatinous mass because adjustments are made to the polyp behavior related to a stressor.

High e notes on the bass, as a slap, can dang near break windows I don't know how these corals don't dislodge. they are super glued in with cyanoacrylate gel, which many know to be insoluble in saltwater so for the scale of things I guess it can hold pretty well. A good portion of the vase is linked by coralline, just like the real reefs, and this adds stability when transporting it and I would suppose for home concert runs.
Proton Soup
#23
Dec9-09, 10:11 PM
P: 1,070
Quote Quote by ViewsofMars View Post
Normally, from what I understand it is impossible for an aquarist to duplicate the wave energy needed for corals. However, the good news seems to me that your music may also be contributing to their mortality . Check it out...
corals can do surprisingly well without so much current. but a lot of people will use "wavemakers" to cycle powerheads on and off to avoid dead spots. and some go so far as to build surge generators that use the same nonlinear dynamics of a flushing toilet to deliver very strong currents intermittently.
brandon429
#24
Feb24-10, 10:53 AM
P: 37
I have a real test of identification skills for any biologist out there!!! It is possible in a very minor way that I have captured several live coral planula inside the reefbowl searching for a place to implant...this form of reproduction absolutely has not been documented in a pico reef anywhere so Im rather excited. With their age and stability I would not be suprised, this vase will hit it's fifth year in several months and that's ridiculous for a pico tank...a lucky effect of great salinity control.

But, a master biologist has posited these can also likely be flatworms, yet he agreed to be open minded with a diagnosis (ongoing) because he didn't know of any right off the bat that held these 16 prominent radial protuberances~I read that flatworms are normall symmetrical or amoeboid at worst, not knobby?

Please you guys forward these to any ID pros you know of, we are really keeping an eye out to see if these are planulae

sheck it out

http://www.reefs.org/forums/download/file.php?id=44827

http://www.reefs.org/forums/download/file.php?id=44826
brandon429
#25
Feb24-10, 10:58 AM
P: 37
the closeup slide is almost certainly zooxanthellae packets. Since this is common to both marine acoel flatworms and corals its really a tricky id. Im leaning towards a platyhelminth because getting sexual reproduction in a pico reef is too lucky for the doldrums of winter.

If macro analysis helps, I originally thought they were flatworms about to break out in my tank from new coral additions, but the strage part is these animals in the slides undulated like a jellyfish and stayed in suspension, touching down to sample an area only for a minute before fluttering back up into the current, round and round in the bowl, before setting down shortly again elsewhere. I pippetted one up before it could make another loop lol

THese pics were taken by holding a flip cell phone about 1/4 inch above an 80x objective on an old antique scope I have, cool huh for low tech purposes!

I was installing some micro aquaculture frag racks, to growout tiny fragments into larger corals for sale, when I saw these worms or planula. The reefbowl with it's daily CA/CO3 additions and good nutrient support is producing coral really well and I wanted some pieces mounted on removable plastic supports that can be removed with tweezers and shipped out.

They are now mounted on the inside of the vase right in the middle, getting the prime feeding/light and current. If you'll watch for updates on the growout, you'll see the vase producing just as well as a 100 gallon reef, I just have to trade the frags off before they get too large.

I bought some really expensive acanthastrea frags, the rarest one my shop ever had, and made some frags from my own 5-year line of hydnophoroids and some acans from the rear of the bowl. To frag a delicate $150 dollar acanthastrea coral, I dremel the base of the skeleton up from the bottom, just up to the corallites and then finish off the living veneer with some clippers to prevent uncontrolled tearing and tissue damage. I'll cut one 150 dollar one into 5 $60 ones, then fatten them up
Both the clones and parent will heal in two weeks.

Normally, gallon reef aquariums cannot produce positive biomass coral loading whatever you do to them!
Attached Thumbnails
micromarihydno.jpg   MicroMariculture1.jpg   micromari3.jpg  
Proton Soup
#26
Feb24-10, 04:13 PM
P: 1,070
IANAB, but they don't look at all like flatworms. appears to be some kind of medusa, let's just hope it's not jellies.
brandon429
#27
Feb24-10, 06:14 PM
P: 37
thanks for checking it out! im sure along with bad hitchhikers like aiptasias, majanos and eunice worms there are some kinds of jellies or jelly hydromedusae that can be outbreak prone, great idea. the movement was so characteristially jelly, and so I drew that relation to the planular stage in scleractinians as a distant hopeful...Dr. Shimek agreed they are more likely not planula due to the movement, but it hasn't been firmly ruled out as finding specialists to know the planula morphology of the varied corals is really tough, fun little micro hunt thanks for stopping by man
B
jsovine
#28
Mar8-10, 02:56 PM
P: 1
Quote Quote by brandon429 View Post
I have wanted to review these ecosystems with other biologists for a while now, usually we just stay on aquarium web sites and just now I found yours. enjoyed reading through the threads and seeing the depth of the discussion, really great place...

...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XOsitYhihc
@brandon429: I had recently viewed your work on youtube completely separate from this website, and it was actually the reason I've been pursuing my interest in sustainable ecology and biology in general, initially in aquatic systems and eventually in land-based systems as well. In fact, I'm considering a career in biology now!

I recently gave a presentation on algal photobioreactors, and plan on constructing a modular system (for upscalability and the ability to study various strains separately) for my local hackerspace as a way to sequester CO2 emissions, and produce fresh oxygen to offset our carbon footprint and increase the quality of air in our building. In the process I really started to connect the dots considering my aquarium obsession and my usual fantasies involving the aquisition of various animals and attempting to replicate their natural environments.

I've been reading up on simpler projects such as the eco-sphere, and have been making preparation to conduct some experiments. I would love to replicate complex marine (or freshwater) ecosystems as you have, as I don't have the luxury of traveling to study said environments in nature first-hand. That said, I have no degrees yet, however. I've been brushing up on general biology courses, downloaded a couple college biology ebooks for 2010, and have been attempting to locate as much information in regards to ecology as I can.

All of this aside, do you have any suggestions as to an aspiring biologist? I've been worried since I've read numerous horror stories told by fresh-out-of-college graduates who are unable to find work and end up working for fast-food and cafe's anyway. I have a decent history in IT, mostly self-taught, and it has brought me through 4 years of actual work experience (including working for a university currently), however. I am going to make the assumption that this is not the case when it comes to academic research (not counting the DIY research I will no doubt be working on for my own interests). Should I get a BS in general biology and go for a Ph.D in a specific field (i.e. ecology, etc)? Or should I pursue a particular field from the start. Do I even need a Ph.D? I am interested in original research, and am self-motivated. I'm hoping that a documented record of my projects and personal research in sustainable ecology will be enough to jump-start me with a BS.

Thank you for your time, I just wanted to let you know that your project has inspired me.

Sincerely,
Justin
brandon429
#29
Mar8-10, 08:13 PM
P: 37
Really nice to meet you I got the message on youtube comments first and responded there

you have a new friend response too it was fun to ponder some career options I may indeed explore one day as well, and your zest for such a fun start in science will only pay off financially and more importantly internally for you. the work you mentioned in carbon sequestration is particularly interesting as there are many new building management degrees both at the grad and undergrad level that incorporate MIS and biology talk about two permanently-needed fields, really nice to meet you.

thanks for replying new friend
Brandon M
Lubbock Tx
brandon429
#30
Aug16-10, 09:13 AM
P: 37
Thought Id dredge up the thread for any new coral keepers who might have joined physicsforums this year...also there are coral husbandry updates, new vids showing calcification/coralline algae removal techniques to managed aged bowls and some biology behind invertebrate sustenance in the microhabitat. the coral banded shrimp and l. tessellata boxer crab have cohabitated for about 35 months now with regular moltings and territory defense, interesting stuff.

It also dawned on me that a series of established, aged reefbowls would be fine test substrates for Gulf oil spill destruction biology. one could set different dilution tests/long term tests and the microhabitats tend to register environmental changes much much faster than larger marine systems perhaps this ratio is of some benefit when conducting impacts on established coral communities...

invert care in the micro habitat:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuIIPFeUd2Q


calcification removal+ pics of assorted marine microhabitats:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3onG2SvzKc
Attached Thumbnails
MacroSideopentop5.23.10.jpg   macroOpenTop4.jpg   BenthicGrowth1.jpg  
brandon429
#31
Dec19-11, 11:59 PM
P: 37
Strangest thing...

yesterday I got this email, but when I checked here there was no response?
Dear brandon429,

johnsmith86 has just replied to a thread you have subscribed to entitled - Video of my marine biology work - in the Biology forum of Physics Forums.

This thread is located at:
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthr...9&goto=newpost

Here is the message that has just been posted:
***************
nice information
***************


There may also be other replies, but you will not receive any more notifications until you visit the forum again.

All the best,
Physics Forums


So maybe someone didn't want to kick up an old thread and they deleted after posting but the message already came to my inbox>...if its any interest the bowl is going strong. My whole point is that this new/old technique for keeping and studying corals in the simplest containers is not a fad, its real science. Here are some progression pics, the system is years old now, it is the longest running pico reef on the web, find something older and post if possible Id like to review their care methods.
The coming years will test the approaches that run the bowl, I believe it has a truly indefinite biological lifespan.
coral progression in this pic just over one year from my last follow up:
Attached Thumbnails
Open top 6..11.21.11.JPG   Opentop1update.jpg  
brandon429
#32
Dec20-11, 12:07 AM
P: 37
here's that brown montipora sps shown from the outside of the bowl. I found they display annular ring growth like a tree, could be helpful for discerning age of specimen in wild studies.

In the captive aquarium, the strata are defined by variations in tank chemistry and become rather obvious. In nature where conditions are consistent I think the effect is less pronounced, its likely some microscopy or skeletal analysis/corallite comparisons would be needed to uncover the same growth depositions.

As a continuing challenge, nobody has been able to identify my mystery organisms from the prior pages, Ive shown the pics to master online invert biologists and none have been able to show a link describing the organism.

The bowl is a very long term study of mixed coral communities in the hyperconcentrated environment. updates again in 2013
Attached Thumbnails
Annulargrowthringsmontiporadigitata.jpg  
brandon429
#33
Dec20-11, 12:13 AM
P: 37
brandon429
#34
Apr17-12, 05:43 PM
P: 37
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Fk8R3clElQ
Hi biological buddies. Every few months I like to make updates to chart the longevity of the microsystem and the original hermatypic corals in the vase, what they do, reproduction, new challenges for the bowl etc

So in 2010 and 2011 a new direction in captive coral reef maintenance became known involving the dosing of strong oxidizer (peroxide) as a means of preventing primary producer infestation around captive reef systems, this is interesting to test in my super aged pico reef because of the coral density to volume etc, we are able to test the application of weak (3%) and super strong (35%) peroxide in the tank to test its efficacy on common reef pests as well as the impact to the reefbuilding corals thriving in the vase.

The vase is about 6 yrs old now with the original corals and a few new ones completing the genera count to 16 in situ

we are making inferences about allelopathic models, temperature sensitization, feeding and reproduction and now effects of excessive oxygenation/free radical management within the micro ecosystem

the video is pretty boring but not if you can look past its corny techno music to see this one gallon vase is getting treated with 35% peroxide on a regular basis, the corals are growing even faster and there has been no detriment to the benthic and microbial communities (test results are the same from 2006)

-peroxide is not a requisite antibiotic as has been stated


see ya'll next year!
B
brandon429
#35
Apr17-12, 05:45 PM
P: 37
additionally, not one biologist has been able to identify the organism I posted on page 2 in the middle. years after the pic was taken and across tons of forums, this little one gallon tank has produced organisms that defy taxonomy. let me know if any one is feeling froggy lol


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