Stephen Hawking says there is no God. But,...


by William Tu
Tags: hawking, stephen
twofish-quant
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#19
Jan9-12, 10:22 PM
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One other thing to note. Stephen Hawking is pretty brilliant when to comes to quantum gravity, but his opinions on the existence of God or the best way of making pizza are not likely to be any better than yours or mine.

Also since we are dealing with zero data, his opinions about what happened before the big bang aren't likely to be *that* much better than yours or mine. He has a view of what happened at the big bang (he thinks that's a meaningless question) but there are people working on a lot of alternative ideas.
PAllen
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#20
Jan9-12, 11:26 PM
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Quote Quote by twofish-quant View Post
One other thing to note. Stephen Hawking is pretty brilliant when to comes to quantum gravity, but his opinions on the existence of God or the best way of making pizza are not likely to be any better than yours or mine.

Also since we are dealing with zero data, his opinions about what happened before the big bang aren't likely to be *that* much better than yours or mine. He has a view of what happened at the big bang (he thinks that's a meaningless question) but there are people working on a lot of alternative ideas.
I was there but I'm not telling.
Fredrik
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#21
Jan10-12, 12:00 AM
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Quote Quote by William Tu View Post
If you would like to, you take take a look at the video here http://youtu.be/A2IOOnAdP2s directly from 32'38". It won't take you too much time. The whole argument starts from "the cause", and I think it probably went wrong in the end. And the main problem to me is that he says time stops. But according to relativity, time doesn't stop but simply looks slow from the outside observer. The clock which falls into the black hole still ticks at its own pace. Time doesn't stop inside the event horizon. But here in this documentary, Dr. Hawking suggests the idea that the very beginning of the universe is a big black hole and time stops,... he says there was no time. This contradicts what we know from the relativity. There is time. Just ticks in a different pace from the outside of the black whole.
OK, I watched until 39:00, so I've seen that the documentary did in fact say some pretty strange things.
yenchin
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#22
Jan10-12, 02:02 AM
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Quote Quote by William Tu View Post
If you would like to, you take take a look at the video here http://youtu.be/A2IOOnAdP2s directly from 32'38". It won't take you too much time. The whole argument starts from "the cause", and I think it probably went wrong in the end. And the main problem to me is that he says time stops. But according to relativity, time doesn't stop but simply looks slow from the outside observer. The clock which falls into the black hole still ticks at its own pace. Time doesn't stop inside the event horizon. But here in this documentary, Dr. Hawking suggests the idea that the very beginning of the universe is a big black hole and time stops,... he says there was no time. This contradicts what we know from the relativity. There is time. Just ticks in a different pace from the outside of the black whole.
In general relativity, time marches on inside the black hole *until* you hit the singularity, which in a sense is the "end" of time. But again not knowing what exactly happens there it is hard to say for sure if time really does end.
yenchin
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#23
Jan10-12, 02:09 AM
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This is also an interesting read: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/co...-a-black-hole/
Cosmo Novice
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#24
Jan10-12, 03:24 AM
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Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
The other night he was on a chat show and told the other guests "there are an infinite number of universes where an infinite number of things are happening. Therefore there is a universe where...[something to do with the trivial topic of conversation]." Such blatant popularisation and assertion of many-worlds theory does not endear me to him.

That and a large number of my female friends find him irresistible
Eww I never heard him say anything along those lines and glad I didn't! And phinds us Brits dont all sound smarmy!
phinds
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#25
Jan10-12, 04:53 AM
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Quote Quote by Cosmo Novice View Post
... And phinds us Brits dont all sound smarmy!
I agree. You don't. But HE does.
phinds
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#26
Jan10-12, 04:57 AM
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Quote Quote by twofish-quant View Post
One other thing to note. Stephen Hawking is pretty brilliant when to comes to quantum gravity, but his opinions on the existence of God or the best way of making pizza are not likely to be any better than yours or mine.
...
I basically agree, but with this caveat: His earlier statements were not that there IS no god, but rather that because of the way quantum fluctuations work, there does not HAVE to be a god because the universe can start itself without any external help. For this opionion, I think he IS more qualified that most of us. But once he started saying that there IS no god, then I agree w/ you that this is just a personal opinion of his, not evidence based.
Cosmo Novice
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#27
Jan10-12, 05:54 AM
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Quote Quote by phinds View Post
I agree. You don't. But HE does.
Just as an aside, thankyou for the advice on Steven Weinbergs "The First Three Minutes" - I am about halfway through but reading going slow as doing between projects. And the boss keeps coming back to the office!

The book is very accessable and quite clear what Steven is saying - essentially it is cementing the foundations of standard theory for me while raising some important questions which I will address later in a new thread.

Do you have any other recommendations? Prefferably light on math - I am teaching myself some mathematics at the moment but am only qualified upto highschool mathematics and until recently did no calculus since then which was a number of years ago!

Any links/recommendations appreciated.

Cosmo
William Tu
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#28
Jan10-12, 06:20 AM
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Quote Quote by Cosmo Novice View Post
Just as an aside, thankyou for the advice on Steven Weinbergs "The First Three Minutes" - I am about halfway through but reading going slow as doing between projects. And the boss keeps coming back to the office!

The book is very accessable and quite clear what Steven is saying - essentially it is cementing the foundations of standard theory for me while raising some important questions which I will address later in a new thread.

Do you have any other recommendations? Prefferably light on math - I am teaching myself some mathematics at the moment but am only qualified upto highschool mathematics and until recently did no calculus since then which was a number of years ago!

Any links/recommendations appreciated.

Cosmo
It is not book, but I watched it and maybe it recommendable. It's entire course videos, homework and reference books for the entry level of astrophysics at Yale university. Open Yale Course ASTR 160: Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics.
http://oyc.yale.edu/astronomy/fronti...class-sessions
These can be watched on YouTube or iTunes for free. The math in it is at high school level.

Looking forward to your another thread concerning "The First 3 Minutes". I tried to find it on the internet but the ebooks are all not complete.
Cosmo Novice
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#29
Jan10-12, 08:52 AM
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Quote Quote by William Tu View Post
It is not book, but I watched it and maybe it recommendable. It's entire course videos, homework and reference books for the entry level of astrophysics at Yale university. Open Yale Course ASTR 160: Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics.
http://oyc.yale.edu/astronomy/fronti...class-sessions
These can be watched on YouTube or iTunes for free. The math in it is at high school level.

Looking forward to your another thread concerning "The First 3 Minutes". I tried to find it on the internet but the ebooks are all not complete.
Thanks I have watched a few of those Yale lectures but did not have the rest or all in one place.

Try http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...AxQb2TMhHPI0KQ for a .pdf of The First Three Minutes
William Tu
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#30
Jan10-12, 09:25 AM
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Quote Quote by Cosmo Novice View Post
Thanks I have watched a few of those Yale lectures but did not have the rest or all in one place.

Try http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...AxQb2TMhHPI0KQ for a .pdf of The First Three Minutes
It's awesome! Thanks! :D
phinds
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#31
Jan10-12, 09:38 AM
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Quote Quote by Cosmo Novice View Post
Just as an aside, thankyou for the advice on Steven Weinbergs "The First Three Minutes" - I am about halfway through but reading going slow as doing between projects. And the boss keeps coming back to the office!

The book is very accessable and quite clear what Steven is saying - essentially it is cementing the foundations of standard theory for me while raising some important questions which I will address later in a new thread.

Do you have any other recommendations? Prefferably light on math - I am teaching myself some mathematics at the moment but am only qualified upto highschool mathematics and until recently did no calculus since then which was a number of years ago!

Any links/recommendations appreciated.

Cosmo
One thing that comes to mind that's light on math (no equations at all, just some geometric diagrams) is "General Relativity from A to B" by Robert Geroch. I'm only half way through it but have found it very helpful in getting me familiar with "world lines" which you will see in some discussions on this forum, and which are helpful in understanding some of the concepts discussed here.

I'd suggest you do a forum search on "recommended books" since I recal several such threads over the last year or so and I think they generally give some idea of the math dept required to make the books accessible.
Cosmo Novice
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#32
Jan10-12, 01:28 PM
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Quote Quote by phinds View Post
One thing that comes to mind that's light on math (no equations at all, just some geometric diagrams) is "General Relativity from A to B" by Robert Geroch. I'm only half way through it but have found it very helpful in getting me familiar with "world lines" which you will see in some discussions on this forum, and which are helpful in understanding some of the concepts discussed here.

I'd suggest you do a forum search on "recommended books" since I recal several such threads over the last year or so and I think they generally give some idea of the math dept required to make the books accessible.
Yeah I already did and have a nice long list, was just looking for personal recommendations
phinds
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#33
Jan10-12, 04:20 PM
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Quote Quote by Cosmo Novice View Post
Yeah I already did and have a nice long list, was just looking for personal recommendations
Good. One thing I would caution you about is that the "math level" comments are sometimes WAY off from what they would be if one of us made them. I bought one book that was recommended as having "very little math / very easy math" and that is undoubtedly the case for the person who wrote the comment, but it is most emphatically NOT the case for me (well, the "easy" part was mostly true, but the "very little" was WAY off).
SHISHKABOB
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#34
Jan10-12, 08:15 PM
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Why Does E=mc2?: (And Why Should We Care?) is by Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw

I read half of this a few years ago and it was pretty good. It doesn't have any math tougher than the Pythagorean theorem and it proclaims this quite proudly. I haven't taken any courses in university on special relativity yet but I think it did a good job of explaining it, in that I wasn't going "wait... what did he say," in fact the opposite happened. It went on to talk about space-time but I got distracted by other books and things so I never finished it.

I also saw his Wonders show and though I do agree that he's a bit funny acting and his accent sounds silly, I got past that pretty quick because what he was actually saying was far more interesting.


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