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Transition metals melting points

by Chemist20
Tags: metals, transition
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Chemist20
#1
Jan28-12, 06:45 AM
P: 87
I found this on a webpage:

In any transition element series, the number of unpaired electrons first increases from 1 to 5 and then decreases back to the zero .The maximum five unpaired electrons occur at Cr

WHY?????????????' doesn't it occur at MN???????
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DaleSwanson
#2
Jan28-12, 01:08 PM
P: 351
In addition to the 5 d orbitals, there is the s orbital available. Each orbital can hold two electrons, but the preference is for them to only have single electrons until there is no more space available. It should now be clear that there is room for 6 electrons to have their own orbitals. The 6th element in row 4 is Cr.

This is a wonderful site for visualizing trends in the periodic table. In this case, click over the orbitals tab.
http://ptable.com/
Chemist20
#3
Jan28-12, 01:10 PM
P: 87
Quote Quote by DaleSwanson View Post
In addition to the 5 d orbitals, there is the s orbital available. Each orbital can hold two electrons, but the preference is for them to only have single electrons until there is no more space available. It should now be clear that there is room for 6 electrons to have their own orbitals. The 6th element in row 4 is Cr.

This is a wonderful site for visualizing trends in the periodic table. In this case, click over the orbitals tab.
http://ptable.com/
thanks! :)


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