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Gas in tank exposed to a vacuum

by GZunich
Tags: exposed, tank, vacuum
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GZunich
#1
Mar15-12, 08:44 PM
P: 4
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
A tank is equally divided into two equal halves, one a vacuum and one filled with argon gas at 298K and 700 bar. The divider bursts and the gas equally disperses throughout the tank. What is the new T and P of the gas assuming argon is an ideal gas?


2. Relevant equations
PV=nRT P1V1/T1=P2V2/T2


3. The attempt at a solution
I assumed there was no temperature change which I am unsure of but using that logic, P=350 bar and T=298K
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rude man
#2
Mar16-12, 04:01 AM
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Begin with the definiton of an ideal gas. Hint: it's more than just pV = nRT.
What can you say about the dependence of U, internal energy, as a function of p,V and/or T?
Then go with the first law and show that you get the same results whether the free expansion is adiabatic or isothermal or anything inbetween.
rude man
#3
Mar16-12, 04:04 AM
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Quote Quote by GZunich View Post
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
A tank is equally divided into two equal halves, one a vacuum and one filled with argon gas at 298K and 700 bar. The divider bursts and the gas equally disperses throughout the tank. What is the new T and P of the gas assuming argon is an ideal gas?


2. Relevant equations
PV=nRT P1V1/T1=P2V2/T2


3. The attempt at a solution
I assumed there was no temperature change which I am unsure of but using that logic, P=350 bar and T=298K
You can't make that assumption unless you can prove it.

Begin with the definiton of an ideal gas. Hint: it's more than just pV = nRT.

What can you say about the dependence of U, internal energy, as a function of p,V and/or T?

Then go with the first law and determine if you get the same results whether the free expansion is adiabatic or isothermal or anything inbetween.


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