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Work done in capillary action

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AudioFlux
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Apr14-12, 02:56 AM
P: 58
This question struck me when i was watching a liquid rise in a capillary tube. I'm curious to know from where the energy gets transferred to the liquid to rise above the surface. Well, one possible explanation that i can think of is air pressure. Though, it can be a possible reason only if the other end is closed (i don't remember if it was open or closed). So am i on the right track?
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tiny-tim
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Apr14-12, 05:07 AM
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Hi AudioFlux!
Quote Quote by AudioFlux View Post
I'm curious to know from where the energy gets transferred to the liquid to rise above the surface. Well, one possible explanation that i can think of is air pressure.
No, it's surface tension, see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capilla..._of_a_meniscus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wetting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contact_angle

(if the contact angle is greater than 90, the solid surface is hydrophobic, and the liquid will fall

this is how those damp-proofing injections work, they line the capillaries in the bricks with a hydrophobic lining)


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