The Nuclear Power Thread


by russ_watters
Tags: nuclear, power
Astronuc
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#469
Sep19-12, 03:44 PM
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Opportunities at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in UK.

http://www.culhamphd.org.uk/
http://www.culhamphd.org.uk/typicalPhDtopics.html

http://www.york.ac.uk/physics/postgraduate/fusion-dtn/

Also - Science and Technology Facilities Council
http://www.stfc.ac.uk/Our%20Research/14397.aspx
Astronuc
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Nov18-12, 06:22 PM
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http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/C_...n_1411121.html
14 November 2012

EOn continues to struggle under German energy policy, with gas generation made "barely profitable" by pro-renewable market arrangements and nuclear generation slashed and taxed by government decree.

The utility has summarised its performance from January to the end of September, explaining to shareholders that it would honour dividend predictions for 2012, but would revise ambitions for 2013 and 2015. Despite a worsening outlook, the company still recorded pre-tax earnings of €8.8 billion ($11.2 billion) with 'underlying net income' of about €4 billion ($5.0 billion) for the first nine months of 2012.

One problem is that renewable generation is given priority access to the grid when it is available. This sometimes prevents gas-fired generation from operating during peak hours and has altered the economics of gas to such an extent that it is now "barely profitable to operate," said CEO Johannes Teyssen. "In most European markets, the gross margin for gas-fired units is approaching zero or is indeed already negative."

. . . .
This an example of a poor energy and economic policy on the part of the German government, and it is harming the economy.
etudiant
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#471
Nov19-12, 07:20 AM
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German energy policy is constrained by anti nuclear sentiment on the one hand (fuelled by media support of a small cadre of activists plus public distrust sustained by unrelenting publicity focused on the nuclear industry's failures) along with the recognition that gas supply from Russia is unreliable (it was turned off just a couple of winters ago).
The fix is more coal fired power, because the 'green' alternatives are falling well short of requirements for reliability and quantity.
Astronuc
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Nov21-12, 11:36 AM
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mPower empowered by SMR funds
http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/NN...s_121112a.html

Meanwhile

Alstom unveils world's longest turbine blade (for large low pressure (LP) steam turbines)
http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/C-...e-2011128.html

Also, note that Europe uses 50 Hz, to large turbines are usually 1500 RPM (although some are designed for 3000 rpm) rather than 1800 rpm used in 60 Hz systems.

In 3000 rpm turbines, the last stage blade length is on the order of 1.35 m
http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/mediablob...power/blob.pdf
CFDFEAGURU
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#473
Nov21-12, 01:31 PM
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I have done work on the ALSTOM HP and LP coolers used in the GT-24 and GT-26 gas turbines. Lots of ASME code calcs .....
Astronuc
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Nov29-12, 10:16 PM
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Bethlehem-based Lehigh Heavy Forge Corp. teaming with N.C. company to make nuclear reactors
http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/beth...eaming_wi.html
Bethlehem-based Lehigh Heavy Forge Corp. expects to add 100 jobs over the next 10 years through a partnership announced today with a North Carolina nuclear technology company.

The South Side foundry is teaming with the Babcock & Wilcox Co. to supply forgings for a new brand of small modular reactors being developed by B&W. Officials announced the partnership at an event joined by Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett and local business and government officials.

. . . .
Astronuc
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#475
Dec2-12, 08:29 AM
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Quote Quote by World Nuclear Association
On 2 December 1942 a team of 49 scientists led by Enrico Fermi started the world's first nuclear reactor. 70 years on two of team recounted their experiences in this video.
Argonne nuclear pioneers: Chicago Pile 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tKf7R2XncM
Astronuc
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Dec7-12, 09:05 PM
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Some background on Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels.

http://cryptocomb.org/Nuclear%20Reac...nd%20Fuels.pdf

It's mostly correct, but a bit off in places.

Also, for material properties - http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-co...024/cr7024.pdf
Astronuc
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Dec15-12, 01:49 PM
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Prometheus Project Reactor Module Final Report, for Naval Reactors Information
http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/...aFN/884680.pdf (64 MB)

1771 References in Bibliography

It's reasonably comprehensive on the state of the art, and relevant to many topics in the forum. It's a good supplement to the Gen-IV literature.
Astronuc
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#478
Mar12-13, 09:27 PM
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Vogtle 3 and 4 and V C Summer 2 and 3 (both twin AP1000 sites) are under construction.

Vogtle has been doing ground work for sometime.

On March 9, pouring of the basemat for Unit 2 commenced. It lasted about 50 hours as a continuous pour.

The basemat provides a foundation for the containment and auxilary buildings that are within the unit's nuclear island. Measuring 1.8 metres thick, the basemat required some 5350 cubic metres of concrete to cover an area about 76 metres by 49 metres. The concrete-pouring process took just over 50 hours and was completed at about 10.00am on 11 March.
http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/NN...r-1203134.html


Update: March 13, 2013

Southern Nuclear began pouring the basemat at Vogtle 3, a day after SCANA/SCE&G began the pour at Summer 2. It takes about 50 hours to pour the basemat.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/me...tor-foundation

Southern Nuclear has begun pouring of specially designed basemat concrete for the foundation of its Unit 3 Plant Vogtle reactor, just three days after similar steps were completed at SCANA’s V.C. Summer plant in South Carolina.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/me...nt-vogtle-site

(Jan 24) The reactor vessel head, weighing 160 tons, serves as the “lid” of the Unit 3 reactor and will be bolted to the even-larger reactor vessel body – a 300-ton component that remains in Savannah, Ga., awaiting shipment to the site aboard a specially built rail car.
Astronuc
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May5-13, 05:39 AM
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Japan signs deal with Turkey to build nuclear plant
http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/04/world/...?iref=obinsite
(CNN) -- Turkey and Japan have agreed to a $22 billion deal to build a nuclear power plant in Turkey, the semi-official Turkish news agency Anadolu reported.
. . . .
http://www.atmea-sas.com/scripts/ATM....asp?P=57&L=EN

Large LWRs of Gen 3 generation are on the order of 1.1 to 1.2 GWe. ATMEA is roughly the same capacity as Westinghouse's AP-1000.
Astronuc
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Nov5-13, 09:15 PM
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The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was established in 2000 to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to meeting the energy needs of the 21st century in a sustainable manner. It is a mechanism for INPRO Members to collaborate on topics of joint interest. The results of INPRO's activities are being made available to all IAEA Member States.
http://www.iaea.org/inpro/
http://www.iaea.org/INPRO/about.html

INPRO Programme 2012-2013
Project 1: National Long Range Nuclear Energy Strategies
Project 2: Global Nuclear Energy Scenarios on Sustainable Nuclear Energy
Project 3: Innovations in Nuclear Technology
Astronuc
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Feb2-14, 02:48 PM
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A relatively new development in aneutronic p+B11 fusion.

. . . .
A team led by Christine Labaune, research director of the CNRS Laboratory for the Use of Intense Lasers at the Ecole Polytechnique in Palaiseau, France, used a two-laser system to fuse protons and boron-11 nuclei. One laser created a short-lived plasma, or highly ionized gas of boron nuclei, by heating boron atoms; the other laser generated a beam of protons that smashed into the boron nuclei, releasing slow-moving helium particles but no neutrons. The researchers describe their work in Nature Communications today.
. . . .
Timing was crucial for the success of the experiment, says study co-author Johann Rafelski, a theoretical physicist at the University of Arizona in Tucson. The boron plasma generated by the laser lasts only about one-billionth of a second, and so the pulse of protons, which lasts one-trillionth of a second, must be precisely synchronized to slam into the boron target. The proton beam is preceded by a beam of electrons, generated by the same laser, that pushes away electrons in the boron plasma, allowing the protons more of a chance to collide with the boron nuclei and initiate fusion.

. . .
http://www.nature.com/news/two-laser...energy-1.13914

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/13...comms3506.html
jimgraber
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#482
Feb2-14, 05:35 PM
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Congratulations to the team for their successful demonstration. Are there any energy in/energy out calculations for the experiment? And a fortiriori, for a scaled up actual power producing reactor?
mheslep
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Feb5-14, 09:44 AM
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From the abstract alone I'm not clear what contribution is made by this work at CNRS on fusion. Fusion with p+B11 has been done long ago with accelerators and targets, and beam fusion of any kind has no path to net power. Is the contribution purportedly in the use of lasers?
Astronuc
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Feb14-14, 05:17 AM
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"First concrete had been poured at the construction site for the world’s first small modular reactor (SMR) project. The SMR under construction is called the CAREM 25, which is not only an indigenous Argentinian design, but also the first-ever indigenous Argentinian power reactor design."

http://ansnuclearcafe.org/2014/02/13...-construction/
Jon Richfield
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Feb14-14, 08:03 AM
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If everyone here will pardon my ignorance as a non-physicist, could someone please tell me why it is necessary for the B11 to be in plasma form? The protons certainly, but is there some subtle resonance that bulk boron lacks that is necessary for the nuclear fusion and subsequent fission? It is not as if the resultant He4 would form any persistent ash or poison, surely?
Astronuc
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Feb14-14, 10:08 AM
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Quote Quote by Jon Richfield View Post
If everyone here will pardon my ignorance as a non-physicist, could someone please tell me why it is necessary for the B11 to be in plasma form? The protons certainly, but is there some subtle resonance that bulk boron lacks that is necessary for the nuclear fusion and subsequent fission? It is not as if the resultant He4 would form any persistent ash or poison, surely?

It's a consequence of the process and the temperature.


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