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Non-massed particles gaining mass

by dbmorpher
Tags: boson, higgs, mass, photon
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dbmorpher
#1
Dec5-12, 04:05 PM
P: 52
Would it be possible to have a mass-less particle such as a photon given mass through the Higgs field?
Could the photon be slowed down by a lowering of the energy level then absorb the H boson?
I know the answer is probably no but I would like to learn why.
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mfb
#2
Dec5-12, 04:16 PM
Mentor
P: 11,589
If a particle (better: a particle type) gains mass via the Higgs mechanism, it has that mass always, and everywhere. There are no massless particles which "somehow" get mass later. Concerning why.... it is a result of quantum field theory.

a lowering of the energy level then absorb the H boson?
That does not make sense (both).
dextercioby
#3
Dec5-12, 05:18 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 11,895
The Higgs mechanism is just a theoretical 'trick' to achieve the correct renormalizable interactions in the Standard Model of Particles and Interactions. The particles are 'massive' to begin with.

Bill_K
#4
Dec6-12, 05:44 AM
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Bill_K's Avatar
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Non-massed particles gaining mass

Actually, the particles are massless to begin with. Right after the big bang the temperature is so high that the vacuum state is a false vacuum, in which the expectation value of the Higgs field is zero, electroweak symmetry is unbroken, and the masses of the gauge bosons, quarks and leptons are zero.
dbmorpher
#5
Dec6-12, 02:31 PM
P: 52
So in high energy stellar collisions the vacuum of space is broken and symmetry scattered?
Bill_K
#6
Dec6-12, 03:10 PM
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Bill_K's Avatar
P: 4,160
The energy required is something like 1014 to 1016 GeV, corresponding to a temperature of 1027 to 1029 K. The only time such a temperature ever existed was in the big bang.


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