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Best Songs Ever

by Evo
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ImaLooser
#2611
Dec6-12, 09:17 PM
P: 570
Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post


She swings!

The best jazz musicians these days seem to be Japanese women. Here's my fave Take Five.

SW VandeCarr
#2612
Dec7-12, 04:10 PM
P: 2,499
Quote Quote by ImaLooser View Post
She swings!

The best jazz musicians these days seem to be Japanese women. Here's my fave Take Five.

Well, there's no questioning her technical virtuosity and, for the most part, I enjoyed her interpretation. But maybe you could explain to me why talented jazz musicians, mostly pianists, like to throw in such harsh dissonant chords and break the rhythmic flow. Is it to shock, or maybe wake up the audience? Brubeck used do that too. Only Thelonious Monk could do that and make it work, IMHO.
ImaLooser
#2613
Dec8-12, 02:46 AM
P: 570
Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
Well, there's no questioning her technical virtuosity and, for the most part, I enjoyed her interpretation. But maybe you could explain to me why talented jazz musicians, mostly pianists, like to throw in such harsh dissonant chords and break the rhythmic flow. Is it to shock, or maybe wake up the audience? Brubeck used do that too. Only Thelonious Monk could do that and make it work, IMHO.
I think it sounds great. But I'm a jazz musician who loves novelty, so I'm in a tiny minority.
SW VandeCarr
#2614
Dec8-12, 03:56 AM
P: 2,499
Quote Quote by ImaLooser View Post
I think it sounds great. But I'm a jazz musician who loves novelty, so I'm in a tiny minority.
Oh. I see. What do you play? Still, I suppose slamming your fist down on the keyboard every once in a while is novel, but is it music? (At least that what it sounded like to my uneducated ear.)
OmCheeto
#2615
Dec8-12, 11:15 AM
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Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
Oh. I see. What do you play? Still, I suppose slamming your fist down on the keyboard every once in a while is novel, but is it music? (At least that what it sounded like to my uneducated ear.)
I was formally educated in music from the 3rd thru 7th grades, at which point I decided for some reason that playing the violin was not cool. So I'm not sure I have a properly educated ear either. But George Harrison's "naughty chords" comes to mind:

Quote Quote by dratironmusic
.... Composers use tension to keep the listener interested. It puts you into the song and makes you want, however subconscious it may be, the song to go a certain way. Harrison's use of rhytmic and harmonic tension is what keeps us hooked in every song. It is the reason we listen to it and find joy in it because he was a master at it. He was a master of directing us through each of his songs, taking our emotions and manipulating them with naughty chords and time changes but always taking us back home in the end. As long as this entry has been, I have only begun to scratch the surface of Harrison's masterful songwriting. In future updates I will discuss what production aspects give him his distinct sound as well as analyise his most impressive compositions so that we can all explore, together, the inner workings of brilliant music.
...
If you think this quote is long, the original article is 20 times longer, and I think you'd need a PhD in music to comprehend it all.

Without getting into the details of how to construct each chord, I'll show you examples. A Cmajor chord is built on the note C-E-G. The distance from C to E is a major third (hence a major chord). A Cminor chord is built on the notes C-Eb(b=flat)-G. The distance from C to Eb is a minor third.
Without getting into the details? It's like being in math chat.


Quote Quote by George
People always say I'm the Beatle who changed the most, but really that's what I see life is about. You have to change.
ImaLooser
#2616
Dec8-12, 08:21 PM
P: 570
Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
Oh. I see. What do you play? Still, I suppose slamming your fist down on the keyboard every once in a while is novel, but is it music? (At least that what it sounded like to my uneducated ear.)
I play electric bass and a little bit of piano.

Playing music changes your brain (really) so musicians hear music differently than ordinary people, and highly trained musicians hear differently from casual ones. It's like learning a language, so yeah, we have got our own secret world. Very beautiful, but lonely.

Music is strictly for fun, so is what I hear "better" than what you hear? No, just different. You might even say that all that training is a waste of time. It has no practical use, that's for sure.

As to the "It's all cultural conditioning" theory, that's a load. You'd be amazed at how much agreement there is amongst musicians as to what is good and what is bad.
ImaLooser
#2617
Dec8-12, 08:31 PM
P: 570
Quote Quote by OmCheeto View Post
I was formally educated in music from the 3rd thru 7th grades, at which point I decided for some reason that playing the violin was not cool. So I'm not sure I have a properly educated ear either. But George Harrison's "naughty chords" comes to mind:



If you think this quote is long, the original article is 20 times longer, and I think you'd need a PhD in music to comprehend it all.



Without getting into the details? It's like being in math chat.
I've skimmed that article and think it is BS. (The references to "his lose timing" and "mark of genious" don't help.) Diminished and augmented chords were common in pop music from 1920 to 1960. That's what the Beatles grew up with. It used to be completely normal, so anyone can learn that stuff.

"Here Comes the Sun ... Harrison shifts from 4/4 to 3/8 to 5/8 to 2/4. It's craziness unmatched anywhere else in rock music but it's brilliant." This is hogwash. It's especially silly because it applies to some John Lennon or Led Zeppelin but not George. Listen to "Good Morning" or "Black Dog" or "The Ocean." This guy is full of it.

Basic harmony is pretty simple, but if you don't know it it might as well be algebraic topology. There is harmonic theory but I find it of limited use. The ear is all that really matters. Beatles tunes are very pleasing to the ears, but sometimes contradict theory.

Pop music for some reason has devolved to being very, very simple in every way. So yeah, ordinary pop tunes from 1940 are PhD material in comparison.
OmCheeto
#2618
Dec8-12, 09:12 PM
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Quote Quote by ImaLooser View Post
I've skimmed that article and think it is BS. (The references to "his lose timing" and "mark of genious" don't help.) Diminished and augmented chords were common in pop music from 1920 to 1960. That's what the Beatles grew up with. It used to be completely normal, so anyone can learn that stuff.

"Here Comes the Sun ... Harrison shifts from 4/4 to 3/8 to 5/8 to 2/4. It's craziness unmatched anywhere else in rock music but it's brilliant." This is hogwash. It's especially silly because it applies to some John Lennon or Led Zeppelin but not George. Listen to "Good Morning" or "Black Dog" or "The Ocean." This guy is full of it.

Basic harmony is pretty simple, but if you don't know it it might as well be algebraic topology. There is harmonic theory but I find it of limited use. The ear is all that really matters. Beatles tunes are very pleasing to the ears, but sometimes contradict theory.

Pop music for some reason has devolved to being very, very simple in every way. So yeah, ordinary pop tunes from 1940 are PhD material in comparison.
hmmm...

I disagree with everything except for the fact that current pop music all sounds like "mary had a little lamb" lately.

ps. This is supposed to be kind of like an MTV thread, only with music, unlike MTV....



Quote Quote by Joni
Oh but now old friends are acting strange
and they shake their heads, they say I've changed
well something's lost but something's gained
in living every day
kill your drama!

pps. Did I self sensor, or did someone delete my repost of Arildno's Opera piece?
Quote Quote by arildno View Post
I don't know if I've posted this before, but Diana Damrau's performance as The Queen of the Night is just magical:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvuKxL4LOqc

Or is there a music counter? I offered my bartender $5! if he'd play that the other day. He said; "No Opera!"

.......

kids......
OmCheeto
#2619
Dec10-12, 12:50 AM
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I'm very glad my younger brother bought me a mandolin for my birthday 7(?) years ago.

I can play along with music anytime I want.

turbo
#2620
Dec10-12, 10:32 PM
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Get on your bikes and ride!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMnjF1O4eH0
dlgoff
#2621
Dec11-12, 09:45 PM
Sci Advisor
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I figure Greg is my PF "Pusher Man". Thanks for the fixes man.



BTW: Thanks Evo for the extra "Push".
dkotschessaa
#2622
Dec13-12, 02:59 PM
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P: 586
Quote Quote by Gad View Post
And I suppose you don't understand what they say?
Oh, of course I have a general idea what it's *about* I guess, but no, no idea what they are saying specifically, though I know that a lot of it is their version of scat singing so it's not translatable.


I like Sufi music too, only a different type-- Turkish sufi music. Which rely mostly on the instrument ney/flute [my favourite instrument]. This piece is called 'quiescence':


I'll have to see if that works in my study playlist. :)


I also adore Sufi poems, here's one by Ibn Al Rumi (Jelalludin Rumi):


VERY cool. I love Rumi also. Though I haven't got theistic inclinations, Rumi's poetry has always resonated with me in a special way.
dkotschessaa
#2623
Dec13-12, 03:07 PM
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Quote Quote by nazarbaz View Post
That's beautiful. In north Africa, there is a more primal form of esoteric "music" called gnawa or diwan. I'm a disciple of it. It's part of some shamanistic rituals brought up by the descendents of african slaves in the northern shores of the continent. Beauty is not what they look for, they go far beyond it to the deepest layers of our brains and minds. In my view, it's one of the most sophistcated and powerful grooves you can find on the planet.

Master Hmida Boussou
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpNC3eWjafs
Master Benaissa
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yX3trisF6mE

This is the soul of a people.
Thanks. This has the kind of groove I'm looking for. For whatever reason this stuff kind of tunes my brain into a contemplative/concentration mood, whereas western music causes me to go into a kind of analytic mode (I'm a classical and jazz guitarist), which is distracting.

Another one that comes up on my Jango playlist based on Nusrat's stuff is this one:



I have no idea in what tradition it's originally based, (obviously it's now in a pop tradition, but I don't know where it might be rooted). Have no idea what language it is or what they are even saying, but it's beautiful.

-Dave K
nazarbaz
#2624
Dec13-12, 04:09 PM
P: 44
Quote Quote by dkotschessaa View Post
Thanks. This has the kind of groove I'm looking for. For whatever reason this stuff kind of tunes my brain into a contemplative/concentration mood, whereas western music causes me to go into a kind of analytic mode (I'm a classical and jazz guitarist), which is distracting.

Another one that comes up on my Jango playlist based on Nusrat's stuff is this one:



I have no idea in what tradition it's originally based, (obviously it's now in a pop tradition, but I don't know where it might be rooted). Have no idea what language it is or what they are even saying, but it's beautiful.

-Dave K
That's what gnawa is all about. The full effect cannot be reached before several hours of playing or listening and the guidance of a master. Some jazz musicians, like Randy Weston, got interested in it for the same reasons you mentionned and made very good stuff of it.
Thank you for sharing.
turbo
#2625
Dec14-12, 11:34 AM
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Got to take them as they come.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jXrmAKBBTU
dkotschessaa
#2626
Dec14-12, 12:02 PM
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P: 586
Quote Quote by SW VandeCarr View Post
Well, there's no questioning her technical virtuosity and, for the most part, I enjoyed her interpretation. But maybe you could explain to me why talented jazz musicians, mostly pianists, like to throw in such harsh dissonant chords and break the rhythmic flow. Is it to shock, or maybe wake up the audience? Brubeck used do that too. Only Thelonious Monk could do that and make it work, IMHO.
Jazz can be a bit like a drug. People that listen to a lot of it often start looking for "stronger stuff." I like a lot of dissonance and I like tricky rhythms, but only if they fit into the musical structure. In this case, I wouldn't say the rhythmic flow is "broken." But it does take a bit of sophistication to understand in what way the rhythm is being played with. Same with the chords.

-Dave K
(also a jazz musician)
nazarbaz
#2627
Dec16-12, 04:12 AM
P: 44
A beautiful blues from the desert sands...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYpBl3i5TVs
Adyssa
#2628
Dec16-12, 07:57 PM
P: 188
I've been listening to a lot of Tinariwen lately, an African blues / vocal ensemble, it's amazing music, I love the blues fusion!



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