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Quick question on field quanta...

by I2004
Tags: field, quanta
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I2004
#1
Dec29-12, 03:11 AM
P: 57
what does it mean when someone says field quanta are not spatially localized?

does it mean they are in superpostion or they are just moving very fast?

sorry if I sound daft
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I2004
#2
Dec29-12, 03:22 AM
P: 57
and are field quanta virtual particles that pop in and out of existence?

I read "field quanta are not spatially localized since they are not excition states at a certain point of the field but have to be assigned to the field system as whole"

can someone explain why they have to be assigned to the system as a whole?


please help...
Bill_K
#3
Dec29-12, 06:31 AM
Sci Advisor
Thanks
Bill_K's Avatar
P: 4,160
When describing a complex system we try to use the excitations which are simplest, namely the normal modes. For a free field the normal modes are the plane waves. A disturbance that was initially localized would not stay that way, it would spread to neighboring points and be rather difficult to deal with!

I2004
#4
Jan7-13, 11:25 AM
P: 57
Quick question on field quanta...

what I dont get is when it says you must take into account the whole field.

like these field quanta spread accross the whole universe, because the field is everywhere...
I2004
#5
Jan7-13, 11:49 AM
P: 57
I just dont get it when he says they are not exition states at a point in the field.

what are they then? a single quantum is spread everywhere?

please help...


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