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How can we combine metal and fiber together?

by Thenymphadora
Tags: ansys, design, engineering, material, mechanical
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Thenymphadora
#1
Jan15-13, 05:17 AM
P: 8
Hello,

I would like to ask something here. If I would like to combine metal and fiber, what method is the the best because we cant simply glue them together. what material can hold them together. And can we test the strength of them after they stick together using ANSYS software? It would be great if Ansys can generate tensile graph as well. If ANSYS cannot, what software should i use?

(I'm sorry if my english is not good)
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Travis_King
#2
Jan15-13, 09:59 AM
P: 820
What do you mean by combine? If you want to throw a layer of some material on a sheet of metal, you can absolutely glue it on. Elmer's wont work, obviously, but an appropriate selection of epoxy or similar material would in many cases.
Thenymphadora
#3
Jan15-13, 06:50 PM
P: 8
Actually I am doing an engineering project for my bachelor. I am looking for a method to use both metal and fiber together in underwater condition. We can't simply glue them together if we are building a ship from metal and fiber. So I am looking for the strongest way to combine them together.

berkeman
#4
Jan15-13, 07:06 PM
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How can we combine metal and fiber together?

Quote Quote by Thenymphadora View Post
Hello,

I would like to ask something here. If I would like to combine metal and fiber, what method is the the best because we cant simply glue them together. what material can hold them together. And can we test the strength of them after they stick together using ANSYS software? It would be great if Ansys can generate tensile graph as well. If ANSYS cannot, what software should i use?

(I'm sorry if my english is not good)
Quote Quote by Thenymphadora View Post
Actually I am doing an engineering project for my bachelor. I am looking for a method to use both metal and fiber together in underwater condition. We can't simply glue them together if we are building a ship from metal and fiber. So I am looking for the strongest way to combine them together.
By "fiber", do you mean carbon fiber composites? Or do you mean a fabric of some sort?
Thenymphadora
#5
Jan16-13, 02:30 AM
P: 8
yes..its carbon fiber composites.
AppleBite
#6
Jan16-13, 10:11 AM
P: 54
Are you talking about a sheet of metal (steel or aluminium?) and a sheet of CFC? In that case some form of epoxy should work.

Best results would obviously be achieved if you use the epoxy on overlapping faces of the sheets, i.e. not end to end. This wille depend on the expected loading mechanism on the joint
Travis_King
#7
Jan16-13, 10:47 AM
P: 820
As far as putting CF on steel, really some form of epoxy (call 3M and see if they have anything to fit your application) is, as far as I know, your only real option. Drilling holes for bolts and rivets may (or will likely) decrease the structural integrity of the CF.

Are you are talking about some sort of steel subframe, rather than sheet-on-sheet?

My question: what do you hope to gain from the addition of CF on steel (from what I understand, CF and Aluminum don't mix well over the long haul, though there are ways around that I think)? They're both strong, but they have different stiffnesses, and that will likely become a major problem when the components are loaded and unloaded.

Is this for a hull, or a keel, or what?

Adding steel to CF kind of defeats the purpose of the CF in the first place, no?
Travis_King
#8
Jan16-13, 10:49 AM
P: 820
This article might be of some help. Worth a look

here
Travis_King
#9
Jan16-13, 10:53 AM
P: 820
Check out this thread as well: Here
Thenymphadora
#10
Jan16-13, 08:26 PM
P: 8
Thanks Travis King.. I am starting to find my answer in the article you linked me.. Thanks for everybody help..


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