The odds in the game risk


by adrianopolis
Tags: game, odds, risk
adrianopolis
adrianopolis is offline
#1
Jan16-13, 03:04 PM
P: 10
In risk, the attacking party rolls 3 die and the top two numbers of the 3 die rolled get put up against 2 die rolled by the defender. If the die are equal then the defender wins. For example if the offender rolls 5 5 2 and the defender rolls 4 3, then 2 defender men die. If the offender rolls 5 5 2 and the defender rolls 5 4 then they trade kills because when die are equal the defender wins.
If offender rolls 5 5 2 and the defender rolls 6 6 the defender wins. Who has the advantage? Attacking or defending? What is the comparative advantage?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur
Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers
Bright points in Sun's atmosphere mark patterns deep in its interior
oay
oay is online now
#2
Jan16-13, 05:55 PM
P: 220
Start with die in the singular and dice in the plural.
haruspex
haruspex is offline
#3
Jan17-13, 08:00 PM
Homework
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks ∞
P: 9,158
Here's one way to approach it.
Break it into four cases from defender's perspective:
++ win on both
+- win on high dice, lose on low
-+ etc.
--

Case ++:
For each defender roll, count attacker possibilities:
6+6: 63
6+5: 53+3.1.52 (attacker rolls no 6s or one 6)
6+4: 43+3.2.42 (attacker rolls no 5s nor 6s, or just one such)
:
6+1: 13+3.5.12 (attacker rolls nothing above 1 or just one such)
(remember to count all above except 6+6 twice)
5+5: 53
etc.
Summing, we get sum for r = 1 to 6 for each of:
r3, 2r3(6-r), 6r2(6-r) = -2r4+7r3+36r2
Sum the series to r and plug in r=6.

Similarly, for case +-:
6+5: 13+3.12.5
6+4: 23+3.22.4
etc.

adrianopolis
adrianopolis is offline
#4
Jan25-13, 04:52 PM
P: 10

The odds in the game risk


Quote Quote by haruspex View Post
Here's one way to approach it.
Break it into four cases from defender's perspective:
++ win on both
+- win on high dice, lose on low
-+ etc.
--

Case ++:
For each defender roll, count attacker possibilities:
6+6: 63
6+5: 53+3.1.52 (attacker rolls no 6s or one 6)
6+4: 43+3.2.42 (attacker rolls no 5s nor 6s, or just one such)
:
6+1: 13+3.5.12 (attacker rolls nothing above 1 or just one such)
(remember to count all above except 6+6 twice)
5+5: 53
etc.
Summing, we get sum for r = 1 to 6 for each of:
r3, 2r3(6-r), 6r2(6-r) = -2r4+7r3+36r2
Sum the series to r and plug in r=6.

Similarly, for case +-:
6+5: 13+3.12.5
6+4: 23+3.22.4
etc.
Thanks man. I'm a little confused by what for example 3.1.5^2 means but thanks for the help
kmwest
kmwest is offline
#5
Jan26-13, 09:09 PM
P: 27
Analyzed here:

http://datagenetics.com/blog/november22011/index.html


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Risk Theory-computing the risk function Calculus & Beyond Homework 0
Analyzing a game for fairness? (game theory question) Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics 6
Probability mass function question. In the game of Risk, battles are decided by Calculus & Beyond Homework 10
Finding the beta risk from the alpha risk Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics 4
relation between odds ratio and relative risk Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics 0