Register to reply

Is there another, better way of doing this? (simple circuit diagram)

by wannab
Tags: circuit, diagram, simple
Share this thread:
wannab
#1
Feb7-13, 04:52 AM
P: 32


I need one small input to switch on a slightly larger circuit permanently, until I cut the power off or until I open the switch. Relays seem a bit expensive and intended for higher voltage applications than I require. Is there a way to swap the relay here with transistors or something?
Phys.Org News Partner Engineering news on Phys.org
Research project on accident-avoiding vehicle concluded
Smaller artificial magnetic conductors allow for more compact antenna hardware
Autonomy expert led team in developing "self-flying planes"
Simon Bridge
#2
Feb7-13, 06:43 AM
Homework
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
Simon Bridge's Avatar
P: 13,033
Depends on how you want to control the switch and under what circumstances.
i.e. you could short-circuit the main one with a wire, and put a small explosive charge (like a firecracker) under the wire. Use a NiCad element to light the fuse.

You could use a knife-switch and a servo.

Since this is to be a "once on always on" device...
You could use a mousetrap as a spring-loaded knife-switch, held open by a bit of fuse wire - blow the fuse and close the switch. (There's a lot you can do with spring-loaded switches.)

But what you do depends on the circumstances.
wannab
#3
Feb7-13, 06:53 AM
P: 32
Quote Quote by Simon Bridge View Post
Depends on how you want to control the switch and under what circumstances.
i.e. you could short-circuit the main one with a wire, and put a small explosive charge (like a firecracker) under the wire. Use a NiCad element to light the fuse.

You could use a knife-switch and a servo.

Since this is to be a "once on always on" device...
You could use a mousetrap as a spring-loaded knife-switch, held open by a bit of fuse wire - blow the fuse and close the switch. (There's a lot you can do with spring-loaded switches.)

But what you do depends on the circumstances.
Sounds like I'll constantly need to replace components which isn't really what I want. I just want the switch to flick when there's a current so that the lamp and the buzzer stay on until someone deals with it.

Simon Bridge
#4
Feb7-13, 08:37 AM
Homework
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
Simon Bridge's Avatar
P: 13,033
Is there another, better way of doing this? (simple circuit diagram)

Ah - so you need to be able to switch it off as well.
That's not what "permanent" means.

There are any number of switching circuits ... depends how it is to be triggered.
Something provides a current when the lamp needs to glow? Presumably not enough current to light the lamp by itself - hence the relay.

What's wrong with just using a transistor?
Something more robust: trip a physical switch with a servo or a solenoid.
skeptic2
#5
Feb7-13, 09:56 AM
P: 1,822
Quote Quote by wannab View Post


I need one small input to switch on a slightly larger circuit permanently, until I cut the power off or until I open the switch. Relays seem a bit expensive and intended for higher voltage applications than I require. Is there a way to swap the relay here with transistors or something?
What is your voltage?
How much current do you want to control?
How much is too expensive?

Could you please explain your symbols?
Is the inductor in the collector line supposed to be the coil of the relay?
If so, what does B represent in the switched circuit?
What does the symbol of the circle with the X in it represent?
Why do you have a resistor in the emitter line and what is its approximate value?
wannab
#6
Feb7-13, 12:47 PM
P: 32
Quote Quote by Simon Bridge View Post
Ah - so you need to be able to switch it off as well.
That's not what "permanent" means.

There are any number of switching circuits ... depends how it is to be triggered.
Something provides a current when the lamp needs to glow? Presumably not enough current to light the lamp by itself - hence the relay.

What's wrong with just using a transistor?
Something more robust: trip a physical switch with a servo or a solenoid.
The problem with a transistor is that it only provides current while it has inputs, afaik you can't arrange them so that an impulse causes a permanent flow of current. Or am I wrong?
wannab
#7
Feb7-13, 12:51 PM
P: 32
Quote Quote by skeptic2 View Post
What is your voltage?
Very small, 6V or something. I haven't bought components yet.
How much current do you want to control?
Not very much. Just enough to light a LED and sound a buzzer.
How much is too expensive?
Well a relay is around 5 on eBay and I thought that was too much. It was also much larger than I expected for such a simple device. If there's a way to do it with transistors that'd be great.

Could you please explain your symbols?
X is a lamp, B is a buzzer.
Is the inductor in the collector line supposed to be the coil of the relay?
Yes.
Why do you have a resistor in the emitter line and what is its approximate value?
I'm not sure if it's completely accurate. I thought if I didn't then it would be a short.
wannab
#8
Feb7-13, 12:55 PM
P: 32
There's a 12V and 40amp relay on eBay for 2. Does this only work for around these levels or would a small current and slight smaller voltage work?
dlgoff
#9
Feb7-13, 01:18 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
dlgoff's Avatar
P: 2,731
Here's a chapter about THYRISTORS with several ways to do what you want.
e.g.



wannab
#10
Feb7-13, 02:45 PM
P: 32
Quote Quote by dlgoff View Post
Here's a chapter about THYRISTORS with several ways to do what you want.
e.g.



Thanks a lot.
dlgoff
#11
Feb7-13, 03:49 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
dlgoff's Avatar
P: 2,731
You're welcome.
skeptic2
#12
Feb8-13, 08:29 PM
P: 1,822
If you decide to go with the SCR circuit which I recommend, I'd also recommend that you put your LED (with the proper current limiting resistor) and the buzzer in parallel. In series, when the buzzer opens, the SCR will turn off.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Is there a simple way to convert from a Logic Circuit Diagram to a Truth Table? Electrical Engineering 0
Simple circuit diagram help Engineering, Comp Sci, & Technology Homework 8
Simple Circuit Diagram (Ohm's Law Application) Introductory Physics Homework 14
RF transmit circuit/RF receive circuit? (Hard to explain; I made a diagram.) Electrical Engineering 8
Simple Sine Wave Oscillator Circuit... I think this diagram is incorrect Electrical Engineering 8