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Move water molecules

by fredreload
Tags: molecules, water
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fredreload
#1
Feb11-13, 05:10 AM
P: 34
Can a strong magnetic field move water molecules because it is a polar molecule. How strong does the field need to be?
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Borek
#2
Feb11-13, 05:41 AM
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Since when magnetic field interacts with stationary charges?
fredreload
#3
Feb11-13, 11:21 AM
P: 34
Water molecule has an electric dipole, so if it is possible to change its orientation in magnetic field, maybe it is possible to move it?

EricVT
#4
Feb11-13, 11:37 AM
P: 163
Move water molecules

Have you came across this in your research of this topic?
Khashishi
#5
Feb11-13, 11:57 AM
P: 887
You might be confusing magnetic field with electric field. A strong electric field and low temperature should cause the water molecules to line up. I don't know if this would form a weird solid-ish phase.
fredreload
#6
Feb11-13, 12:13 PM
P: 34
I am lost on the differences and I came across this article. (http://www.physicscentral.com/experi...20120210095446)
Thanks for clarifying.

How bout giving water a magnetic moment then moving it with electric field?
Drakkith
#7
Feb11-13, 03:29 PM
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Quote Quote by fredreload View Post
How bout giving water a magnetic moment then moving it with electric field?
I don't believe the electric field has any effect on magnetic moments.
fredreload
#8
Feb11-13, 06:51 PM
P: 34
How about electric field effect on magnet, since electric field attracts or repels charges such as electrons and protons. I should say water molecules being passed through a magnetic field instead of magnetic moment.
Drakkith
#9
Feb11-13, 07:07 PM
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Quote Quote by fredreload View Post
How about electric field effect on magnet, since electric field attracts or repels charges such as electrons and protons. I should say water molecules being passed through a magnetic field instead of magnetic moment.
The magnet has a neutral electric charge, so nothing will happen. And water molecules are only very very weakly diamagnetic, and will be very slightly repelled by a magnetic field. But it takes an extremely strong magnet to even notice the effect.
fredreload
#10
Feb11-13, 08:50 PM
P: 34
You are right, the effect of an electric field on water seems to be much stronger. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZYyvOyMowc
Drakkith
#11
Feb11-13, 08:54 PM
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Quote Quote by fredreload View Post
You are right, the effect of an electric field on water seems to be much stronger. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZYyvOyMowc
Interesting. I would not have guessed that the water would have been attracted to the rod.
L4xord
#12
Feb12-13, 03:40 AM
P: 10
Really? I believe the same effect is achieved with a charged balloon.
kbar1
#13
Feb12-13, 05:17 AM
P: 15
Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
...
And water molecules are only very very weakly diamagnetic, and will be very slightly repelled by a magnetic field. But it takes an extremely strong magnet to even notice the effect.
A 10 gigatesla field ... would be lethal even at a distance of 1000 km, tearing tissues due to the diamagnetism of water. At a distance halfway to the moon ... could strip information from the magnetic stripes of all credit cards on Earth.

From [en.wikipedia.org].


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