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Supernova remnants & neutron star

by shounakbhatta
Tags: neutron, remnants, star, supernova
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shounakbhatta
#1
Feb14-13, 10:54 AM
P: 268
Hello,

I want to understand: just as the Crab Nebula is the result of SN 1054 and has a neutron star spinning at the center:

(a) Does all supernova produces a nebula?
(b) Does all supernova remnant has a neutron star at the center?
(c) What is the outcome of Kepler supernova i.e. SN 1604? I mean to ask has it formed a stellar remnant or a neutron star?

(d) Say, if we consider a supernova, S, which has happened in the year 1000, then the stellar remnant, the neutron star or whatever other outcomes have come in that supernova, does it remain forever? I mean to say, is there a specific time duration, after which things die out and nothing is there from that specific supernova?

Thanks.
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phinds
#2
Feb14-13, 11:10 AM
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Quote Quote by shounakbhatta View Post

(b) Does all supernova remnant has a neutron star at the center?
No, some of them form black holes.
Chronos
#3
Feb14-13, 05:39 PM
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Some stars are destroyed by the explosion [pair instability supernova], most become neutron stars, and some possibly become black holes - although we have no observational evidence of a black hole that formed as a consequence of a supernova. Neutron stars, like white dwarfs, are believed capable of surviving for many billions of years before succumbing to old age and becoming black dwarfs. The universe is believed to be too young for this to have yet happened. Neutron stars are also difficult to detect. They are very small and nearly invisible below x ray wavelengths. Neutron stars are also considered strong candidates for gamma ray bursts, some of which are believed to be the result of neutron star mergers. It is also believed such mergers can lead to the formation of a black hole.

shounakbhatta
#4
Feb15-13, 10:04 AM
P: 268
Supernova remnants & neutron star

One question: Is there any stellar remnant or a neutron star as a result of the Kepler super nova?
Chronos
#5
Feb15-13, 05:00 PM
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Yes, an image taken with the Chandra X-ray observatory is here http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2012/kepler/. This little wisp of glowing dust and gas is all that remains. It was produced by a type Ia supernova, which destroys the progenitor star.
shounakbhatta
#6
Feb16-13, 12:08 PM
P: 268
That means it does not have a neutron star?
Chronos
#7
Feb16-13, 11:07 PM
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Yes, it only left that little puff of smoke.


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