The Should I Become An Engineer? Thread


by russ_watters
Tags: engineer
zacky_D
zacky_D is offline
#955
Dec5-12, 07:41 AM
P: 7
Guys,How can i give myself a proper base for engineering?i really enjoy everything about machines,physics etc..and i love math when it can visualised....But over the last few years ,lets say,i was more or less forced to self study for my own satisfaction....Can you guys please tell me how strong should i be in terms of math,or how i can get an upper hand in that section(books?websites?),coz thats the only place i feel i may lag at college,But i really would like to understand all that!..Totally love physics,,just want to love math too :(
pongo38
pongo38 is offline
#956
Dec6-12, 05:41 AM
P: 692
Zacky D Keep practising till the penny drops.
Pronghorn
Pronghorn is offline
#957
Dec12-12, 03:11 AM
P: 26
I'm a recent high school graduate who wants to study Engineering at undergraduate level in a European country.

Here in Europe you don't get to choose your major or switch majors after you enroll. That's why I find it very difficult to figure out what Engineering discipline I want to pursue. (I also tried shadowing/talking to an engineer in real life but to no avail.)

So, I've got to decide between: Mechanical, Electrical and Chemical. I can't say that I have a particular interest in Chemistry or Physics: they all seem pretty cool.

How should I decide?

Thanks!
pongo38
pongo38 is offline
#958
Dec12-12, 05:47 AM
P: 692
Pronghorn, try to get some work experience in any branch you might be interested in. Don't start a course without fire in your belly. You must feel committed right from the start. As a civil engineer, I know that if the foundations are not right, then anything you put on top of them will not endure,
pandasbox
pandasbox is offline
#959
Dec18-12, 08:23 AM
P: 10
-Should I become an engineer?

It depends on you. For me a huge turn off was the misogynist attitudes that many engineers inevitably have, which I wasn't really aware of until I started university. The other thing is, if you have to know the theory in order to understand and appreciate them, science or math is probably better.

-What engineering discipline should I study?

Whichever one you think you will enjoy. For example, don't go into computer thinking you just want the degree to make money, you will hate your life and you will be mediocre at best.

-Is engineering difficult?

Not really. The most difficult part is staying on track with the class. Engineering is easy in the sense that there are no difficult concepts and the profs try not to fail you. Because you will be spending so much time in class, the assignments and labs are generally shorter. I took science and arts electives and found those harder. The "difficulty" of engineering is generally due to difficulty in time management.
rbrayana123
rbrayana123 is offline
#960
Dec29-12, 02:26 AM
P: 45
I really love Physics and can spend a lifetime learning it. However, I've also been hooked onto Chemical Engineering and can really see it as a tool for the change I want to see in the world. Both of them, I see as versatile and applicable to most of the fields I'm interested in. I'd like to believe I can do well in these majors if I put in the effort to prepare before taking the course but I doubt my ability to keep up during the actual semester. Seven more semesters and I don't know what's ahead. Scared garbageless.
Felchi
Felchi is offline
#961
Dec31-12, 10:38 AM
P: 25
I'm a bit curious myself so here are some of my own questions.

What kind of job security would I be able to expect as an engineer?

As an engineer, what, really would I do? Am I just a glorified mechanic?

Is university or college better for engineering?
pongo38
pongo38 is offline
#962
Dec31-12, 04:04 PM
P: 692
Felchi: Your post #961 says quite a lot about you. In brief, no job is secure, but the higher your education and training, the more likely you will be able to work internationally, and thus open more doors. The world of engineering is so vast that there is scope for anyone to find their niche eventually, perhaps not initially when diversity of training is a good idea. Engineers do just about everything. I have met engineers who have acted as nurses, accountants, chemists etc etc in remote sites because of necessity. You just cannot tell in advance what kinds of demands may be made of you. I think that, depending on where you live, you need to get in touch with a local branch of an engineering institution, and go to speak with some real engineers at one of their meetings, and ask them these questions. In most cases, you will be welcomed, and enlightenment will follow. Only then can you judge whether university or college is appropriate.
lazypast
lazypast is offline
#963
Jan2-13, 03:58 AM
P: 79
Hi, Im an engineer in the oil & gas industry - offshore. Im wondering if anyone can offer any advice on learning a 2nd language suited to o&g/offshore engineering (my first is English). I'd imagine Norwegian would open some doors. Thanks
KClose1983
KClose1983 is offline
#964
Jan13-13, 08:02 PM
P: 10
Any opinions on UCF (University of Central Florida) as a school for engineering?
EBENEZR
EBENEZR is offline
#965
Jan27-13, 06:32 AM
P: 31
Quote Quote by lazypast View Post
Hi, Im an engineer in the oil & gas industry - offshore. Im wondering if anyone can offer any advice on learning a 2nd language suited to o&g/offshore engineering (my first is English). I'd imagine Norwegian would open some doors. Thanks

Although I am not in the field of engineering, nor have experience with it, I think I can help with this. If you're wanting to open doors to progression, your best bet is search for employment openings for positions above yours on the internet and see what they would require and/or like. The best bet to find out what employers would like is find out what sort of people are being asked for.
Who Am I
Who Am I is offline
#966
Jan30-13, 09:07 PM
P: 77
Quote Quote by Hellstorm View Post
Do I sound like Engineer material? I'm 16, and still play with Legos... I love building! And am always building something. From rock castles when I was 7, to tree forts when I was 11. To computers, lego buildings and designing lego Spaceships now. I'm a very creative person... from art, to legos, to even writing stories... I'm also into Astronomy and space... I also have always been intrested in how things work. Iím a big Gamer. I like games like Homeworld & Homeworld2, Halo & Halo2... In school, Biology is my Best subject, but not my favorite... thatís history... Math used to be my favorite, but I slowly fell behind with the smartest of my grade and never picked back up on it. so, do I sound like a future Engineer?
Lol I can't speak as an engineer, but I'm thinking of switching and the posts I'm reading are making me feel a bit more like I really should make the switch and that it will fit me.

I just wanted to say, I'm 20, don't have my Legos anymore, but I still build them in my minds eye. And not the block ones: Technics. lol.
Felchi
Felchi is offline
#967
Feb1-13, 02:56 PM
P: 25
Quote Quote by pongo38 View Post
Felchi: Engineers do just about everything. I have met engineers who have acted as nurses, accountants, chemists etc etc in remote sites because of necessity. You just cannot tell in advance what kinds of demands may be made of you.
Then what is an engineer's job description? If engineers do just about everything, how am I supposed to know whether being an engineer is right for me?
pongo38
pongo38 is offline
#968
Feb1-13, 04:40 PM
P: 692
Briefly, engineers make things out of stuff.
Felchi
Felchi is offline
#969
Feb3-13, 12:33 PM
P: 25
So something like an inventor?
EBENEZR
EBENEZR is offline
#970
Feb7-13, 05:30 AM
P: 31
Quote Quote by Felchi View Post
So something like an inventor?
I don't think most engineering is new things so not inventing, though in the case of new products or new designs or refinement, new work will be patented so some inventing will be done. But there would be a lot of problem solving.
Felchi
Felchi is offline
#971
Feb24-13, 02:31 PM
P: 25
Is engineering in danger of becoming a globally outsourced job, with engineers from developing countries willing to work for little pay taking over the field?
CherryTrooper
CherryTrooper is offline
#972
Mar24-13, 08:29 AM
P: 7
Quote Quote by Felchi View Post
Is engineering in danger of becoming a globally outsourced job, with engineers from developing countries willing to work for little pay taking over the field?
Doubt it. Engineering is specialized and requires higher education. It's one field where "Good enough" is not good enough.


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