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Radon price: $4/m ?

by Bruce Bacher
Tags: $4 or m, price, radon
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Bruce Bacher
#1
Mar31-05, 10:18 AM
P: 4
I'm doing some research on Radon. I have to put together a PowerPoint presentation that describes its origins, properties, characteristics, etc. (Each student was assigned a different element.)

One piece of information I'm required to report on is current price to purchase a sample of the element. I have found only one source that mentions a purchase price for Radon, and it says "Radon can be purchased for approximately $4/m." - without further explanation.

What is "m"?? I assume it must be a unit of volume or mass, but if so I'm not familiar with it.

Any ideas?
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brewnog
#2
Mar31-05, 10:39 AM
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Mmmmm metre, that well known unit of mass...

Can we see the source?
Bruce Bacher
#3
Mar31-05, 11:07 AM
P: 4
Yes, of course! Sorry, I should have posted that.

The actual quote is "Radon is available at a cost of about $4/m."

http://www.scescape.net/~woods/elements/radon.html

edit: That same source has a table above the text which states that the cost is "$/100g" (no numeric value is given).

Bruce Bacher
#4
Mar31-05, 11:21 AM
P: 4
Radon price: $4/m ?

Hmmm... I just found another source that says: "Radon is available at a cost of about $4/m Ci."

I know that Ci is a Curie, measuring radioactivity. Could "m Ci" mean mCi: a milli-Curie?

edit: second source is http://www.speclab.com/elements/radon.htm
Andrew Mason
#5
Mar31-05, 11:52 AM
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P: 6,654
Quote Quote by Bruce Bacher
Hmmm... I just found another source that says: "Radon is available at a cost of about $4/m Ci."

I know that Ci is a Curie, measuring radioactivity. Could "m Ci" mean mCi: a milli-Curie?
That would be right.

AM
Bruce Bacher
#6
Mar31-05, 11:54 AM
P: 4
Woohoo! That makes a lot more sense than "m"!


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