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Feline Aggression

by Bystander
Tags: aggression, feline
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Bystander
#1
Apr11-06, 06:22 AM
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Two year old, 20 lb., neutered, long-hair, gray tuxedo, 4-cylinder Mitsubishi with squeaky fan belt purr, picked up by daughter as a stray hanging around work 'bout a year ago (ditched by college kid at end of kittenhood?), absolutely refuses to consider allowing the four "senior partners" to continue existence: 16 yr. old, neutered, gray DSH, down to a rather gaunt 7 lb. from a very chubby 15, working on mo. 20 of "one month, two at most" (feline facial cancer), still eats like a bottomless pit full of hollow-legged wolves; his best buddy, 14, 15 lb., long-hair, neutered, toasted marshmallow ragdoll; and "the licorice brothers," neutered, 12, 15 and 20 lb. medium hair.

The aggressive behavior? Nothing so civilized as the "Kzin 'scream and leap,' " --- it's more "leap and attempt to kill." Actually a little terrifying in a way --- no flattened ears, raised back hair, spitting or cussing --- just go for the "leopard vs. Lucy" occipital bite and basal skull or cervical fracture.

PestMart (sic) doesn't take drop-offs; we're leery of turning him into the local shelter with his attitude toward other small animals; and, we aren't about to try the "gato a gato" approach to socializing --- scrappy 7 lb. cancer case vs. 20 lb. street fighter ain't gonna work, and the other three are pacifists --- territorial about the yard, and ornery, but still pacifists.

Anyone got ideas on socializing a people loving, cuddly, fastidious, bright, cooperative ("Stay inside the fence? No problem." --- excepting --- "Leave the other cats alone? My long-hair, gray a**! Lemme at 'em!") cat? After a thoroughly punctured palm and 20 lbs. of scratched up licorice face this weekend, we're at wits' end.
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Moonbear
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Apr11-06, 06:49 AM
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You might have some luck with confining the aggressive one in a room with just enough space under the door for it to sniff the other cats, and in slowly re-introducing them all to each other with barriers between them, and escape routes for the older cats, but since it sounds like this cat is not even giving "warning" of aggression with displays before going for the throat, it just might not work.

If the cat is affectionate around people, and is only aggressive around other cats, the best chance of a peaceful existence for all is probably adopting it out to a home without other cats, and ensuring the new owners are aware of this aggression toward other animals so they know they won't be able to get another cat with this one around and are comfortable with that before they commit to adoption. You can call the shelter before considering dropping him off there to make sure they would be willing to take such a cat and could find a home for him. Most shelters can handle cases like that. They won't adopt out a pet that is aggressive toward humans in any way, but if it's only aggressive toward other animals, they can ensure the people adopting the cat do not have other pets. But, sometimes that takes longer to find such a home (that's a big commitment to say you're not going to get another pet for the next 14-18 years...however long this scrapper lives), so I'd just make sure the shelter is one that isn't already overcrowded and euthanizing the pets that are slow to be adopted before dropping him off.


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