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Finding m/s with revolutions and radius

by Visual1Up
Tags: m or s, radius, revolutions
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Visual1Up
#1
Nov6-06, 02:07 PM
P: 12
I am confused on how to find m/s in the following problem:

r = 2.6km
one revolution of circle = 360s

I need it for ac = v^2/r

Thanks!,
-Mike
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rsk
#2
Nov6-06, 02:24 PM
P: 147
How many radians is 1 revolution?

How do you convert rad/sec to m/s?
Visual1Up
#3
Nov6-06, 02:46 PM
P: 12
Well one rev is always 2pi, so 2pi/360s ... I am unsure of how to convert that. I found one solution that tells me to use C = 2(pi)r and v = d/t, so d = 2(pi)(2600m)... so v = 2(pi)(2600m)/360s .... v = 45.4 m/s? Is this the best way to do the problem or am I making it too complicated?

rsk
#4
Nov6-06, 03:09 PM
P: 147
Finding m/s with revolutions and radius

That looks right to me.

Angular velocity w = 2 pi / 360, and v is rw

that w is meant to be an omega
Visual1Up
#5
Nov6-06, 03:12 PM
P: 12
ah, I see. v = rw does seem a lot more simple than what I did though


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