ADHD & Ritalin


by pmb_phy
Tags: adhd, ritalin
pmb_phy
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#1
Jul15-07, 12:15 AM
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I need some help here. My psychiatrist believes that its possible that my problem with focusing my attention could be a result of ADHD or my chronic depression. He prescribed Ritalin. Does anyone have first hand knowledge of what its like to take this stuff?

Thanks

Pete
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Astronuc
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#2
Jul15-07, 09:05 AM
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It's possible that Ritalin (methylphenidate) would help. It stimulates the brain centers and helps people with ADHD 'focus'.

My son takes Concerta, a time released version of Ritalin. He really does need it to focus.

http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/methylphen.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methylphenidate


You might want to get a second opinion on Ritalin as a possible treatment for depression. It seems from the literature that people with anxiety, tension, or agitation should not take Concerta.

http://www.concerta.net/concerta/pag...ntprodinfo.jsp
pmb_phy
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#3
Jul15-07, 10:36 AM
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Quote Quote by Astronuc View Post
You might want to get a second opinion on Ritalin as a possible treatment for depression. It seems from the literature that people with anxiety, tension, or agitation should not take Concerta.
Thanks for the response.

My psychiatrist knows me well enough to know whether what he was doing when he prescribed it to me. I 'll start taking it this Tuesday. I'll keep this thread informed of my progress so that others with concentration problems can learn of my reaction to it.

Pete

baywax
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#4
Jul16-07, 04:21 PM
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ADHD & Ritalin


The Boston Globe report

An alternative to Ritalin prescribes exercise instead

Albani said she was doubtful, at first, of the center's contention that physical exercises like tossing a beanbag and balancing on a wobble board could improve his focus and mental processing. But after just six months in the two-year program, which costs $4,500, her son had shown impressive gains, she said.
''I was skeptical because it's not a proven treatment," she said. ''But it's helped him so much."
http://www.boston.com/news/local/art...rcise_instead/

Here's the address for the Adult ADD Support group (edit:The Dore program was created in England six years ago by Wynford Dore, who was trying to find a cure for his daughter's severe dyslexia.)

http://www.maaddsg.org/news_5_4_06.htm


Defrauding pharmaceutical marketing claims with expert commentary.

http://www.adhdfraud.org/commentary/12-8-00-1.htm
K.J.Healey
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#5
Jul16-07, 10:26 PM
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Are you currently on antidepressants? I had a friend that noticed when he was on antidepressants, i dont remember which, but its major effect clouded his focus. This helped him lead a happier life, but made it neigh impossible for me to tutor him in Fields. He asked his phsych about it and they refused to recommend ritalin or aderol, and instead said to start taking half doses. He did notice a difference in his focus and grades.
I'd recommend some research on related problems if your'e currently on anti depressants. And perhaps a second medical opinion.
pmb_phy
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#6
Jul16-07, 11:17 PM
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Quote Quote by Healey01 View Post
Are you currently on antidepressants? I had a friend that noticed when he was on antidepressants, i dont remember which, but its major effect clouded his focus. This helped him lead a happier life, but made it neigh impossible for me to tutor him in Fields. He asked his phsych about it and they refused to recommend ritalin or aderol, and instead said to start taking half doses. He did notice a difference in his focus and grades.
I'd recommend some research on related problems if your'e currently on anti depressants. And perhaps a second medical opinion.
I already got a second opinion today. All my doctors, especially my psychiatrist who is the expert on what antidepresants can do, is the one who prescribed the Ritalin. As far as it works, time will tell. I have to first determine whether I can tolerate it. Then we wait to see if it either helps or hinders. Seems to me that your friend should have tried another anti-depressant, not stop them all together. That's just jumping the gun way too soon.

I recommend that your friend ask his doc for a different anti-depressant.

Pete
wuliheron
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#7
Jul17-07, 02:47 AM
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Yes, whatever you do, don't expect instant gratification. It may take up to three years to find what works with your particular body chemistry.
baywax
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Jul17-07, 12:18 PM
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Quote Quote by wuliheron View Post
Yes, whatever you do, don't expect instant gratification. It may take up to three years to find what works with your particular body chemistry.
Try three years of the bean-bag balancing therapy and other physical excercises. Its actually better understood as a treatment than Ritalin and to say the least, anything can happen in three years. Throw some swimming in for good measure. Or try this phys ex stuff along with the Ritalin as a suppliment.
pmb_phy
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#9
Jul17-07, 07:36 PM
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Quote Quote by baywax View Post
Try three years of the bean-bag balancing therapy and other physical excercises. Its actually better understood as a treatment than Ritalin and to say the least, anything can happen in three years. Throw some swimming in for good measure. Or try this phys ex stuff along with the Ritalin as a suppliment.
Due to back injury I can't exercise. I started the Ritalin today and noticed a change. So far so good!

Pete
pmb_phy
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#10
Jul19-07, 06:38 AM
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Update - This Ritalin stuff is wonderful. I feel very different than I used to. A feeling I've never had which means the way I was before was my standard for judging my abilities to myself. Now its like a fog has lifted and I can relax. It feels like my mind was always "turned on" and this made me compulsive in my studies.

If it gets better then I will consider this the answer to my all those prayers I gave God about these problems (Yes, yes. I'm a devout Christian).

Thanks and I'll keep you updated if this gets better or degenerates and makes me ill. Wish good things for me okay folks? I would appreciated it - ower of positive thinking and all that.

Best regards

Pete
Astronuc
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#11
Jul19-07, 07:38 AM
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Best wishes and good luck for a sustained improvement. I hope it continues to work.

One might find though that the body adapts, as it does with any medication.

Exercise is a good thing to do on a regular basis, both for physical fitness and mental health.
pmb_phy
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#12
Jul19-07, 11:29 PM
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Quote Quote by Astronuc View Post
Best wishes and good luck for a sustained improvement. I hope it continues to work.

One might find though that the body adapts, as it does with any medication.

Exercise is a good thing to do on a regular basis, both for physical fitness and mental health.
Thanks very much Astronuc. I sure wish I could exercise. A few years ago I had major surgery on it to relieve pressure on my sciatic nerve. Unfortunately I'll have to live with this pain the rest of my life. Right now we keep it under control by pain meds. I tried joining a gym to slowly get the muscles in my body stronger. I went at a snails pace and my back pain started to degenerate along with a new problem with knew pain. So I won't be able to exercise anymore.

Feels good to feel good. I don't remember my brain not racing anymore. Actually I never knew it was racing until it wasn't anymore!

Best wishes

Pete
Astronuc
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Jul20-07, 07:28 PM
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One could try swimming or exercise in water. Some elderly people with arthritis or joint issues use water to help buoy the body and relieve some stress on the joints and muscles.

Exercise is really important - even if only upper body.
Noxide
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#14
Oct12-09, 01:51 AM
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It helps. A lot.

IQ without methylphenidate HCl in bloodstream 151.
IQ with methylphenidate HCl in bloodsteam 184.

Let me reiterate. It helps a lot.

2 hours after taking it, I felt as though I had missed out on so much.
If you need it, get on it.
If you don't, don't.
Galteeth
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#15
Oct12-09, 02:25 AM
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Quote Quote by Noxide View Post
It helps. A lot.

IQ without methylphenidate HCl in bloodstream 151.
IQ with methylphenidate HCl in bloodsteam 184.

Let me reiterate. It helps a lot.

2 hours after taking it, I felt as though I had missed out on so much.
If you need it, get on it.
If you don't, don't.
I have found that methylphenidate helps with short term spatial memory but is slightly detrimental to free-form association. There is an excellent article on this subject in scientific american. The effects of methylphenidate also vary greatly from individual to individual, and are not consistently predictable ( as well as diminishing over time with repeated use).
rainbow93
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#16
Nov25-09, 09:26 PM
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Ritalin is a good drug for ADHD, but we don't know much about its long term use and effects. It also can be used for depression, although there isn't much research into the effectiveness in that use.
DaveC426913
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#17
Nov25-09, 09:32 PM
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My son was diagnosed with ADD many years ago and was put on Ritalin. It had a dramatic (positive) effect on his ability to concentrate.

[D'OH! Fell for the ol' necroposting trick...]
Galteeth
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#18
Nov26-09, 07:19 AM
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Quote Quote by rainbow93 View Post
Ritalin is a good drug for ADHD, but we don't know much about its long term use and effects. It also can be used for depression, although there isn't much research into the effectiveness in that use.
In my own personal experience, it is helpful as an adjunct for depression, but only in the short term (about a week). Dopamenergic circuits are subject to quite viscious feedback adjustment.


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