How does your brain decide what to remember?


by mikemortal
Tags: brain, decide, remember
mikemortal
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#1
Sep19-07, 04:34 AM
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Why is it that I can remember little unimportant events that happened in my childhood over 20 years ago, but I can't remember what I wore last Monday? I know major events that happened in your life your brain will remember for years, but I can remember one particular day sitting in my elementary school classroom listening to the teacher talk about some uninteresting fact. I cannot remember any other days immediately surrounding this one event. So, I'm a just wondering if any of you science minded folks know how your brain decides which little events to pick out from your past and store permanently in your memory?
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Capuchin
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#2
Sep19-07, 04:53 AM
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I find your observations very strange. I cannot remember a single mundane thing from my life. All my old memories are tied to emotional situations.

Very interesting. Perhaps I'm abnormal in this case. Anyone else care to comment?
DaveC426913
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#3
Sep19-07, 07:14 AM
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I am with mikemortal. The moments remembered from childhood are seemingly from random points and very spotty.

mike, I am fairly convinced that certain memories are significant, even of they don't seem to be. Additionally, they are constantly getting reinforced (and edited!) every time you think of them, which is why they persist.

Capuchin
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#4
Sep19-07, 08:25 AM
P: 29

How does your brain decide what to remember?


Of course, my memories are somewhat random but I can see why I would remember them in each case.

For example: Getting chased by a vacuum cleaner, my old dog biting my hand through a handpuppet, getting a question right in class that nobody else could get the answer to.

Each a rather random example of excitement, pain and pride, respectively.

Are you sure there's no emotional connection? I really can't remember anything that has no obvious reason to remember it.
setAI
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#5
Sep19-07, 11:59 AM
P: 482
squeaky wheel gets the grease- the neural connections that get reinforced into hardwired long-term memory are the ones that continue to be the most active over time- if you remember something from 20 years ago it means that whatever the event was cause some signal patterns between neurons that where reactivated several times- such as in dreams or thinking about the event at the time- analyzing it- just enough of the right kind of thinking and remembering and perhaps your body's chemistry at the time allowed the memory to become a stronger hardwired pattern that could easily be reactivated in the long term future
bassplayer142
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#6
Sep20-07, 10:31 PM
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I remember all kinds of unimportant things from childhood and later. Though I'm only twenty, I don't see how I could forget all the distinct memories from childhood. I remember the parts that were emotionally intriguing and others that had no relevence to anything. It is funny because like someone else said it appears to be spotty. I remember thousands of things from childhood but only remember at that instant. For example, once I hit a home run and that is the only thing I remember. I don't remember before it or after it. By the way, I have hit more then one homerun. :)
Jedlmind
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#7
Sep25-07, 12:17 PM
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I read somewhere that there is a major corralation between events remembered and amount of adrenalin released at that time. For example, the 3 seconds of the drop on the roller coaster in comparison to the 2 hour wait in line took to get there. But, as stated before, there is quite a bit of adrenalin in emotional events (fight or flight), so I could also see that being logical.... And I wish could regurgitate the source of this idea, but i do not remember, must not have been to exciting......
mikemortal
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#8
Oct1-07, 03:38 AM
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[QUOTE=mikemortal;1436501] I am trying to remember a traumatic event from my childhood. I have support from my entire family. But they have very different and strong opinions as to what the outcome will be. Some feel that by remembering all the details I will only be causing myself more pain, yet others feel that by remembering exactly what happened. I can finally put an end to all the heartache and pain that I experience.

Has anyone had hypo-therapy? What was the outcome? Is there anything you would have done differently? I would really appreciate any and all information and comments. Thanks!
Rozenwyn
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#9
Oct2-07, 11:28 AM
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If I remember correctly, the brain basically remembers everything, but the recalling process is affected by the significance of the event in your life. That's why events that affect your emotionally are easier to recall.
spdelpiero
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#10
Oct2-07, 03:04 PM
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I'm not that sure about the brain basically remembers everything because even though I have tried very hard to remember significant events in my life i haven't been able to. It must be something else.
Evo
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#11
Oct2-07, 06:35 PM
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I believe that all memories are stored but that ones tied to strong emotions are usually recalled more frequently and therefor easier to recall. I can recall a lot of insignificant things from the past, many I had completely forgotten. The easiest way to do it is to recall something with more significance and then look around at what else happened at that time, it's like flipping through a photo album with all photos in chronological order, you can flip back and forth. If you focus on a picture, a lot of times you can play the video and see everything as it happened, it's very cool. At least that is how my memory works.

Don't you ever just let your mind wander back and you start seeing flashes of all kinds of insignificant things? At first they are just snippets, but the more you focus on a snippet, the clearer it gets.
Evo
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#12
Oct2-07, 06:44 PM
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[QUOTE=mikemortal;1450104]
Quote Quote by mikemortal View Post
I am trying to remember a traumatic event from my childhood. I have support from my entire family. But they have very different and strong opinions as to what the outcome will be. Some feel that by remembering all the details I will only be causing myself more pain, yet others feel that by remembering exactly what happened. I can finally put an end to all the heartache and pain that I experience.

Has anyone had hypo-therapy? What was the outcome? Is there anything you would have done differently? I would really appreciate any and all information and comments. Thanks!
You might want to talk to a professional and see if they can help you draw the memories out. If it was so traumatic that you have suppressed the memory, it might be best to be under the care of a professional if you really want to remember it.

Good luck, and I hope it all works out for you.

BTW, a clinical psychologist tried to hypnotize me, and I can't be hypnotized.
DaveC426913
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#13
Oct3-07, 01:45 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
BTW, a clinical psychologist tried to hypnotize me, and I can't be hypnotized.
Can't? Or won't?

Hypnotism only works on those who believe it will work.
Evo
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#14
Oct3-07, 03:06 PM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
Hypnotism only works on those who believe it will work.
I agree.

I actually wanted to be hypnotized to see what it was like and the guy was supposedly the top US clinical psychologist that did hypnotism and supposedly had never failed to hynotize anyone. I was his first failure.

My take on hypnosis is that at best it's a relaxation technique.
hypnagogue
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#15
Oct5-07, 08:44 PM
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Quote Quote by mikemortal View Post
Has anyone had hypo-therapy? What was the outcome? Is there anything you would have done differently? I would really appreciate any and all information and comments. Thanks!
Don't do it. You are pretty much guaranteed to come away with a distorted take on what happened. It's surprisingly easy for false memories to take root in everyday cognition, and if anything hypnotherapy to recover memories is even worse.
hypnagogue
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Oct5-07, 09:20 PM
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Quote Quote by DaveC426913 View Post
Can't? Or won't?

Hypnotism only works on those who believe it will work.
Perhaps wanting to be hypnotized is necessary for being hypnotized to some degree, but it's not sufficient. Or else we would expect training programs like these to increase hypnotic susceptibility.
hypnagogue
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#17
Oct5-07, 09:27 PM
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Quote Quote by Evo View Post
My take on hypnosis is that at best it's a relaxation technique.
The existing literature on hypnosis makes it seem that hypnosis is related to attentional functioning more than physiological relaxation.

A couple of things I scrounged up on Pubmed quickly suggest some direct evidence against the view that hypnosis is just relaxation. Hypnosis is possible in an altert state. The effects of alert and relaxation hypnosis can be similar, and both are different from the effects of relaxation training alone.
JasonRox
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#18
Oct8-07, 10:40 AM
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[QUOTE=Evo;1452161]
Quote Quote by mikemortal View Post
You might want to talk to a professional and see if they can help you draw the memories out. If it was so traumatic that you have suppressed the memory, it might be best to be under the care of a professional if you really want to remember it.

Good luck, and I hope it all works out for you.

BTW, a clinical psychologist tried to hypnotize me, and I can't be hypnotized.
I agree. Talk to a professional.

We all have to realize that sometimes we remember things, but it's also possible that it is incorrect. Studies have shown that we forget even the things that we know we know and swear to freaking god we know.


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