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Simply Supported Beam

by mahima
Tags: beam, simply, supported
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mahima
#1
Sep29-07, 08:52 AM
P: 3
The young's modulus of a simply supported beam is given as E= (11/768)*(WL^3)/(I*Y)...
where W=Weight of the load
L=Length of the beam
I=Moment of inertia
Y=Deflection

Is this true???
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FredGarvin
#2
Sep29-07, 12:34 PM
Sci Advisor
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P: 5,095
You need to explain the 11/768. I have a suspicion it is for unit conversions. It would be helpful if you explained. You also mention nothing of the force location or type, i.e. concentrated or distributed. There are a lot of beam equations out there for the scenario you describe.
TVP45
#3
Oct2-07, 11:14 AM
P: 1,127
Well, it could be. I gotta admit 11/768 is a little strange looking. But, this could be something near 5/386. So, 3 questions?
Is y the MAXIMUM deflection?
Where are you measuring y?
Where is the load?
I don't think I've ever seen the equation re-arranged like this in order to determine E. Are you doing an experiment?


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