The frequency of the human body is?


by Chaos' lil bro Order
Tags: evo, frequency human body
Chaos' lil bro Order
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#1
Apr24-08, 11:29 PM
P: 684
I don't want to ask this question in a New Age metaphysical type of way so please don't interpret it as such. What frequency does the human body run at?

Does this question make sense or is it too broad?

I will try to fire off a frew seperate examples of what I mean so that the question is more answerable.


1) Human Brain - neuroscientists find a range of a few Hz to 20 plus Hz. We've all heard the terms Alpha waves, Beta waves, Delta waves and Theta waves to describe the different brain states. What is this measurement of exactly, in a physical sense?

2) Membrane Potentials - we all know they govern tons of biological transport systems, like the classic ion channels where ions of CL-, Na+, K+ pass through membrane channels that have voltage potentials. Does it make sense to ask what frequency these work at?

3) Heart Beat - Clearly this can be measured in Hz. If your heart beats 120 bpm, its beating at 2Hz.

4) Your skin - Human's are constantly radiates thermal radiation off their skin's surface, I'm guessing a frequency of ~1000Hz.

5) Vision - The human brain processes visual images at ~60Hz in brightly lit conditions.


So those examples are a few that I could think of off hand. Personally, of the 5 I'd choose Vision as the best fit for an answer when someone asks what frequency the human body runs at. It bothers me that so many unchecked people use 'frequency' to describe mystical things, in a sort of intellectual cop out. Ok, rant over, but seriously is there a better measure of the human body's frequency than vision?
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AzonicZeniths
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#2
Apr24-08, 11:42 PM
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hahaha, So, potentially, your body has a resonant frequency, possibly some kind of weapon. :O
Poop-Loops
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#3
Apr25-08, 12:13 AM
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No, none of those make any sense. If someone asks you what the frequency of the human body is, punch them.

robertm
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#4
Apr25-08, 12:18 AM
P: 290

The frequency of the human body is?


Quote Quote by AzonicZeniths View Post
hahaha, So, potentially, your body has a resonant frequency, possibly some kind of weapon. :O
Yeah imagine what it would look like if you figured out how to resonate bone!!!
Epic blood bath!!!
neu
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#5
Apr25-08, 07:00 AM
P: 245
This is not far fetched at-all.

In fact, Helicopter pilots in Vietnam often reported difficulties and had accidents as a certain rotor speed cause vibrations which coincided with the resonant frequency of a part of the human eye.

The points made in the OP are irrelevant though. The vibrational properties of a system are purely mechanical. The word frequency has multiple usages; frequency of EM waves, frequency of mechanical oscillation, frequency of occurance. You have used all these.

The question "what frequency does the human body work at?" is ambiguous and basically invalid. In the case of mechanical frequency you could ask what the resonant frequency of a local part of the body is.
Andy Resnick
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#6
Apr25-08, 07:13 AM
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I agree with neu- it's a poorly posed question. Just becasue processes in the body are time-dependent does not mean there is a resonant frequency.
TVP45
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#7
Apr25-08, 07:19 AM
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Various parts of the body do indeed have sympathetic frequencies (I edited this because resonant is not the correct term). In the late 50s and early 60s, the US Army did research on using this as a tactical weapon - for example inducing diarhrea as a way of quickly demoralizing enemy troops.

I used to do a classroom demonstration (in more innocent times when you could still do stuff like this) with low frequency sound. I knew, for example, the frequency response of the bladder and could usually send several students scurrying for the loo.
Cincinnatus
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#8
Apr25-08, 10:08 AM
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to the OP: You would be very interested in the recent book by Buzsaki called "Rhythms in the brain". Here's the Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/Rhythms-Brain-...9135434&sr=8-1

Also, You said vision works at 60 Hz... I'm pretty sure this is much too fast. The retina may be able to respond at such frequencies but further down in visual processing the activity is more persistent. This is what allows us to watch TV at 20-30 frames per second and perceive continuous motion. Also look up the related "phi effect" studied in psychology.

There's another much discussed (if bashed) frequency that gets talked about a lot in neuroscience besides the ones you've already mentioned. Francis Crick and Cristof Koch proposed that the gamma rhythm (30-70 Hz) is a neural correlate of consciousness (NCC). It's never clear exactly what they mean by this (and even less clear if it's true). Francis Crick wrote a popular book about this called "The astonishing hypothesis" in the early 90s. More recently Cristof Koch wrote another one, I think it's called "The Quest For Consciousness".
chemisttree
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#9
Apr25-08, 01:31 PM
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The answer is '3'.
Moonbear
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#10
Apr25-08, 06:06 PM
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I think you've answered your own question in the OP. There is no single frequency that the human body functions at, so there is no answer to your question other than, "No."
Spirit of '55
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#11
Jun7-09, 08:58 PM
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The human body cycles at an average of 70 Hz, and the brain at 72 Hz. Nothing New Agey about it.
Chaos' lil bro Order
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#12
Jun8-09, 09:25 PM
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Quote Quote by Spirit of '55 View Post
The human body cycles at an average of 70 Hz, and the brain at 72 Hz. Nothing New Agey about it.
What do you mean by cycles? You can't give such a definitive answer without explaining what you mean by the 70Hz and 72Hz, you must detail what you mean.
atyy
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#13
Jun8-09, 09:55 PM
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I think it runs at many frequencies - otherwise, how would you be able to "catch the beat" of many different types of music? Look up "limit cycle" and "entrainment". Possibly circadian rhythm too.
Zorba
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#14
Jun9-09, 12:08 PM
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Much too many variables to come up with an "human body frequency", one could come up with some value at a push, but I it would be of exactly no value tbvh, unless you like to delight guests at a dinner party with strange, odd or ultimitely useless facts (I'm not the only one I hope?!) :)
Chaos' lil bro Order
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#15
Jun10-09, 12:23 PM
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Quote Quote by atyy View Post
I think it runs at many frequencies - otherwise, how would you be able to "catch the beat" of many different types of music? Look up "limit cycle" and "entrainment". Possibly circadian rhythm too.
Huh what do you mean by catch a beat? Cilia in the inner ear attenuate varying frequencies of sound, generally ranging from 20Hz to 10,000Hz. Are you talking about bobbing your head to the most prominent drum beat?
Mr Z
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#16
Jul15-09, 07:29 AM
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It is true that the heart beats at 1.2 Hz..but the human brain works in a mysterious way you could even say is has more Hz then any part of the human body, but like i said the human brain is a mysterious organ..what I'm trying to say is that the answer you are looking for it cant be answered, until we get to know the human brain a little more.
Hoho1man
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#17
Aug14-09, 06:06 PM
P: 1
Hey guys--

I have been asking myself the same question but being a bit more of an experimentalist, I have been measuring my (and my wife's) frequency and voltage with an oscilloscope...I have found that on the human body's skin (from touching the probes to the hands, arms, leg, foot, back) a frequency of about 68Hz and it seem the gentleman referring to 70Hz is backed up by my measurement.

I though, "that is pretty close to the power lines (60Hz), wonder if there is some sympathetic resonance going on with the human body or something". I've built a lot of circuits and electronics but have never thought about it or applied it in terms of the human body and it has really got me thinking...

Also, sort of interesting that the waveform is closest looking to a squaretooth wave...I would have thought it would be a sinewave which is much more prevalent in nature. Anyhow, I was searching google to find out more about this oscillation and first found this forum and thought I would add my contribution. I will double check to see if this frequency is all on the positive side or if it actually changes direction (goes negative). I am not near my equipment for a double check now but I think it does reverse direction and I am really perplexed on where in the body this is originating from.

I would love to learn more if someone can point me in the correct direction.

Thanks...
Chaos' lil bro Order
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#18
Aug21-09, 04:29 PM
P: 684
Quote Quote by Hoho1man View Post
Hey guys--

I have been asking myself the same question but being a bit more of an experimentalist, I have been measuring my (and my wife's) frequency and voltage with an oscilloscope...I have found that on the human body's skin (from touching the probes to the hands, arms, leg, foot, back) a frequency of about 68Hz and it seem the gentleman referring to 70Hz is backed up by my measurement.

I though, "that is pretty close to the power lines (60Hz), wonder if there is some sympathetic resonance going on with the human body or something". I've built a lot of circuits and electronics but have never thought about it or applied it in terms of the human body and it has really got me thinking...

Also, sort of interesting that the waveform is closest looking to a squaretooth wave...I would have thought it would be a sinewave which is much more prevalent in nature. Anyhow, I was searching google to find out more about this oscillation and first found this forum and thought I would add my contribution. I will double check to see if this frequency is all on the positive side or if it actually changes direction (goes negative). I am not near my equipment for a double check now but I think it does reverse direction and I am really perplexed on where in the body this is originating from.

I would love to learn more if someone can point me in the correct direction.

Thanks...
I suspect your oscilloscope is picking up electrical impulses from your beating heart. After all 70Hz is about the resting rate of the heart for adults. Go for a jog or do a few pushups and see if it goes up. If it does, check your pulse to see if it matches.


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