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Coefficient of Friction

by wind522
Tags: coefficient, friction
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wind522
#1
Sep7-08, 06:48 PM
P: 5
Question:
A baseball player slides into third base with an initial speed of 8.35 m/s. If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the player and the ground is 0.36, how far does the player slide before coming to rest?

How would I start this problem?? I would use Ff=uFn but it doesn't even give the weight of the player..
And would I have to use one of the kinematics problems to find the distance? If so, how would I find acceleration or final velocity?
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Hootenanny
#2
Sep7-08, 06:53 PM
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Quote Quote by wind522 View Post
Question:
A baseball player slides into third base with an initial speed of 8.35 m/s. If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the player and the ground is 0.36, how far does the player slide before coming to rest?

How would I start this problem?? I would use Ff=uFn but it doesn't even give the weight of the player..
And would I have to use one of the kinematics problems to find the distance? If so, how would I find acceleration or final velocity?
Perhaps you don't need the mass, try using Newton's second law and see what happens . And yes, kinematic equations (after using Newton's second law) sounds like a good idea.
HallsofIvy
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Sep7-08, 06:57 PM
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In other words, just write "mg" for the weight of the player and hope the "m" cancels out!

wind522
#4
Sep7-08, 07:01 PM
P: 5
Coefficient of Friction

How could I use Newton's second law of motion without knowing what any of the variables stand for?
Hootenanny
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Sep7-08, 07:04 PM
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Quote Quote by wind522 View Post
How could I use Newton's second law of motion without knowing what any of the variables stand for?
I'm sure you do know what the variables stand for. Start by writing out Newton's second law and filling in any information that you know.
wind522
#6
Sep7-08, 07:08 PM
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I got it! Thank you guys so much for helping!!
Hootenanny
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Sep7-08, 07:09 PM
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Quote Quote by wind522 View Post
I got it! Thank you guys so much for helping!!
No problem, we didn't really do much anyway!


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