Register to reply

Atwood machine

by physics_geek
Tags: atwood, machine
Share this thread:
physics_geek
#1
Nov8-08, 04:02 PM
P: 84
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
In the Atwood machine shown below, m1 = 2.00 kg and m2 = 7.50 kg. The masses of the pulley and string are negligible by comparison. The pulley turns without friction and the string does not stretch. The lighter object is released with a sharp push that sets it into motion at vi = 2.80 m/s downward.
(a) How far will m1 descend below its initial level?

(b) Find the velocity of m1 after 1.80 s.

2. Relevant equations
f= ma
vf^2 = v^2 + 2ad

3. The attempt at a solution
i think for part a u use the equation i put above..but i dont know how to figure out acceleration...but i think its splitted between the two objects
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
World's largest solar boat on Greek prehistoric mission
Google searches hold key to future market crashes
Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds
alphysicist
#2
Nov9-08, 05:24 AM
HW Helper
P: 2,249
Hi physics_geek,

Quote Quote by physics_geek View Post
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
In the Atwood machine shown below, m1 = 2.00 kg and m2 = 7.50 kg. The masses of the pulley and string are negligible by comparison. The pulley turns without friction and the string does not stretch. The lighter object is released with a sharp push that sets it into motion at vi = 2.80 m/s downward.
(a) How far will m1 descend below its initial level?

(b) Find the velocity of m1 after 1.80 s.

2. Relevant equations
f= ma
vf^2 = v^2 + 2ad

3. The attempt at a solution
i think for part a u use the equation i put above..but i dont know how to figure out acceleration...but i think its splitted between the two objects

To find the acceleration, start by drawing force diagrams for each of the objects. Using [itex]\sum F = m a[/itex] for each of the diagrams then gives two equations with two unknowns.

(You can also use an energy appoach here.)
thisismysn230
#3
Oct19-11, 06:33 PM
P: 1
Use the formula a= (gm1 + gm2)/(m2+m1) to find the acceleration then use the formula V^2=-2ad to find the distance. Bada bing bada boom!
Im still workin on the second part unfortunately...


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Atwood machine Introductory Physics Homework 3
Atwood machine Introductory Physics Homework 2
Atwood Machine Introductory Physics Homework 1
Atwood machine help Introductory Physics Homework 7
Atwood Machine Introductory Physics Homework 4