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Is stainless steel magnetic?

by cragar
Tags: magnetic, stainless, steel
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cragar
#1
Apr7-09, 09:09 AM
P: 2,468
Is stainless steel magnetic?
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Physics_Kid
#2
Apr7-09, 09:50 AM
P: 51
some stainless steels are magnetic. so some seaching for the types/classifications of stainless steels.
mgb_phys
#3
Apr7-09, 09:54 AM
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Generally the higher the nickel content the less magnetic.
All stainless steels will effect a compass but austenitic (300 series) won't stick to a magnet.

nucleus
#4
Apr7-09, 09:55 AM
P: 171
Is stainless steel magnetic?

Yes and No!
http://www.azom.com/Details.asp?Arti...tenitic_Grades
http://www.google.com/support/websea...&answer=134479
Bob S
#5
Apr7-09, 10:13 AM
P: 4,663
The 400 series stainless steel (martinsetic, e.g., 440C stainless) is generally magnetic, while the 300 series (austinetic, e.g., 304 and 316) is not.
Physics_Kid
#6
Apr7-09, 10:27 AM
P: 51
i think i jumped the gun with my answer. considering this is a physics forum i think my reply should have been something like this:

yes, all materials are "magnetic", they all have atoms which have electric and magnetic fields as properties. the question is too general.

if you (the OP) is asking if you can have a magnet stick to stainless then for some stainless steels you need a very strong magnet while for other types of stainless a weak magnet will stick to it.
vanesch
#7
Apr8-09, 02:29 AM
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Iron has two crystal structures, ferrite which is magnetic and austenite which is not (it is paramagnetic, not ferromagnetic). So if your steel contains enough ferrite, it will be (ferro-)magnetic, if not, it won't. Note that martensite is "metastable" austenite, but with a deformation of the crystal structure, and apparently, it is also ferromagnetic.
cragar
#8
Apr8-09, 03:51 AM
P: 2,468
Quote Quote by Physics_Kid View Post

yes, all materials are "magnetic"
Do you consider photons to be a material , do photons have a magnetic moment?

ok so i see there is no cut an dry answer to my question .
vanesch
#9
Apr8-09, 03:56 AM
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Quote Quote by cragar View Post
Do you consider photons to be a material , do photons have a magnetic moment?

ok so i see there is no cut an dry answer to my question .
I took it that you meant "ferromagnetic". And then it depends on the composition of the stainless steel.
cragar
#10
Apr8-09, 06:29 AM
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what do you mean by ferro magnetic
botagar
#11
Apr8-09, 06:43 AM
P: 4
if i remember right from high school physics, Ferro Magnetic means that it is easily magnetized. the domains in the metal align according to the magnet therefore becomming magnetic *i think*.

Google?
vanesch
#12
Apr8-09, 07:31 AM
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Quote Quote by cragar View Post
what do you mean by ferro magnetic
Probably what you mean by "magnetic". "is attracted by a magnet". It is only in ferromagnetic materials that this phenomenon is strong enough to be easily noticed. Many materials have some form of magnetism, which goes under the names of diamagnetism and paramagnetism, but these are small effects compared to ferromagnetism. You need sensitive lab tools to observe it.
cragar
#13
Apr8-09, 07:36 AM
P: 2,468
does ferro mean conating iron , ya pretty much i mean will a magnet stick to it
my chem teacher told me that iron ,cobalt, nickel and liquid oxygen would be affected by a magnet.
Physics_Kid
#14
Apr8-09, 02:11 PM
P: 51
Quote Quote by cragar View Post
Do you consider photons to be a material , do photons have a magnetic moment?

ok so i see there is no cut an dry answer to my question .
strong magnetic field will bend light.

all matter is subject to interaction with magnetic fields. the amount of interaction depends on type of material and flux of magnetic field.
cragar
#15
Apr8-09, 02:36 PM
P: 2,468
is the magnetic field bending the light or the gavitational field made by the magnetic field bending the light.
vanesch
#16
Apr8-09, 02:41 PM
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Quote Quote by Physics_Kid View Post
strong magnetic field will bend light.
?

In classical electromagnetism, no. In QED, there are extremely small corrections which would make for photon-photon interactions, but they will not be such that light is bent, but rather scattered.

Extremely strong magnetic fields will however generate, in general relativity, some curvature (generate some gravity) and that may bend light theoretically. But we are talking about extremely tiny effects here, which, I would guess, are not open to experimental inquiry, as they are so terribly small.
mgb_phys
#17
Apr8-09, 02:42 PM
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Quote Quote by cragar View Post
is the magnetic field bending the light or the gavitational field made by the magnetic field bending the light.
A magnetic field doesn't bend light (there is a quantum effect where photons can convert into electron/positron pairs that are effected by a magnetic field)
A magnetic field doesn't create a gravitational field - other than the mass of the magnet of course!
Physics_Kid
#18
Apr8-09, 03:07 PM
P: 51
i am reaching outside of my immediate knowledge base. a magnetic field can create a gravitational lensing which would cause light to bend.

be it the gravity field by which light bends, the cause was a magnetic field.


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