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Electron Attenuation in Matter

by Mushonti
Tags: attenuation, electron, matter
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Mushonti
#1
Jun20-04, 04:42 PM
P: 1
Hi everybody,
I was wondering if somebody could help me find a chart or a table with electron attenuation lenghts or cross-sections in matter. I've searched the Internet inside-out but even if I would find something, it would be articles that you have to pay for . Still it seems a normal and trivial information to find somewhere. So if somebody has a handbook or something with that information - please let me know. Thanks a lot.
Mike.
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styler
#2
Jun29-04, 03:21 PM
P: 45
Perhaps you need the bethe bloch equation?
Not sure how useful it is for electrons.
i don't know if its still used but as i recall it allows you to adjust certain constants that are typical of the soild you are using and calculate the the velocity damping. (or at least the energy loss as a function of distance) You could maybe use it to calculate something yourself.
Or do you need much data or already publsihed results to compare to?

Is the CRC a possibility?
ZapperZ
#3
Jun29-04, 04:45 PM
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Quote Quote by Mushonti
Hi everybody,
I was wondering if somebody could help me find a chart or a table with electron attenuation lenghts or cross-sections in matter. I've searched the Internet inside-out but even if I would find something, it would be articles that you have to pay for . Still it seems a normal and trivial information to find somewhere. So if somebody has a handbook or something with that information - please let me know. Thanks a lot.
Mike.
I don't quite understand what it is that you're looking for. Are you looking for (1) the elastic mean free path, and/or (2) the inelastic mean free path of electrons moving in various solids? If you are, then you do know that in many cases, these values are dependent on the initial energy of the electrons, don't you?

Zz.


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