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σH adducts

by lmarcantel1
Tags: σh, adducts
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lmarcantel1
#1
Nov1-09, 05:14 PM
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What is a σH adduct? I understand what an adduct is, I am just not sure what the σH is referring to. I could take a few wild guesses; but I've learned that going "John Wayne" doesn't always lead to the the correct answer. (Its cool looking, but not very effective...)

Thanks!
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chemisttree
#2
Nov2-09, 12:09 PM
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"The product formed by the attachment of an electrophilic or nucleophilic entering group or of a radical to a ring carbon of an aromatic species so that a new sigma bond is formed and the original conjugation is disrupted."

From "IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology."
lmarcantel1
#3
Nov2-09, 02:14 PM
P: 2
What about σD adducts? Where does the H and D superscripts come from?

chemisttree
#4
Nov2-09, 03:06 PM
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σH adducts

H is hydrogen. Can you tell what D might be?
nimmysnv
#5
Nov4-09, 04:44 AM
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Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
H is hydrogen. Can you tell what D might be?
According to me D stands for density and this is what I know as, these are the things that comes in chemical terms and they are used for all the equations that are always used.


Thanks!
Borek
#6
Nov4-09, 04:58 AM
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No, D doesn't stand for density here.

Hint: T doesn't stand for time

--
methods


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