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I want to take a Licentiate in Physics becouse i love them, i live in a 3rd w. countr

by AlexES16
Tags: el salvador, phsycis, student, university
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AlexES16
#1
Dec6-09, 05:51 PM
P: 193
Hello people, I have 17 years and in 1 year i will be in the university. Well i love physics and science. When i readed the pensum of a Licentiate in physics i like it more, Quantum Mechanics etc. But i live in El Salvador Central America, so i really dont know how much job oportunitys i could have. And i will like to know some jobs that could have a licentiate in physics and the especializations of the career.
I really love Physics and i will be happy to go in the field. I also like egnineerins like mechanical, mechatronich, but not as much as a licenciate in physics . Please guys if you can give me some advice, experiences and please the fields in wich a licenciate in physics work and type of jobs.

PS: Sorry for my english
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fluidistic
#2
Dec6-09, 07:10 PM
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I'm sure that by licentiate you mean the Bachelor's degree in Physics.
Generally students want to go for a Ph.D right after earning their Bachelor's degree, in the U.S.A. at least.
Advices for you are : getting good grades, getting research experience before graduating and try to get some nice letters of recommendation, if you plan to go for a Ph.D.
I don't really know what you can do with "only" a B.S. degree in hands. I'll let others to shred some light on you.
RadioactivMan
#3
Dec6-09, 09:26 PM
P: 12
Aquí en Argentina después de la licenciatura puedes seguir con el doctorado( hacerlo aqui o en otro lugar depende de la persona) pero al menos aquí existe el "conicet" es una institución que tiene becarios, es decir te pagan por investigar y además lo normal es que al mismo tiempo den clases en universidades(eso hacen varios de mis profesores), deberias ver si hay algo parecido en el Salvador.

Con solo la licenciatura no puedes hacer muchas cosas es muy normal que se continue directamente con el doctorado, oportunidades de hacer un doctorado son abundantes en todo el mundo casi todos(sino todos) son pagos.

Una vez lei un post en un foro de alguien de El Salvador que habia estudiado física ahi pero que luego termino haciendo su doctorado en USA decia que ahi no habia ningún programa, pero como te dije las ofertas son abundantes en todo el mundo y puede que para cuando te gradues ya haya un programa disponible.

La especialización la podríamos dividir en dos grandes grupos:
física aplicada.- te da oportunidades de trabajo en industria y academia, son temas como materia condensada óptica y cosas por ahi.
física teórica.- te deja solo con la opción de academia. Lleva temas como mecánica cuántica, física de altas energía, teoría de campos y cosas por estilo.

Yo empeze con ingeniería electrónica pero luego me cambie a la licenciatura porque en las ingenierías a pesar que llevan física la llevan por decirlo asi solo hasta lo necesario en cada tema(algo que a mi me molesto,razon de mi decisión).Por tanto, te recomendaria la licenciatura si como dices realmente te gusta.

Saludos, espero haber sido de ayuda.

PD:Supongo que preferias la respuesta en castellano.


Primer post en castellano :D.

alxm
#4
Dec6-09, 10:04 PM
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P: 1,866
I want to take a Licentiate in Physics becouse i love them, i live in a 3rd w. countr

Quote Quote by fluidistic View Post
I'm sure that by licentiate you mean the Bachelor's degree in Physics.
Why? In most countries I know that have (or had) a degree by that name (e.g. Germany, Switzerland), a licentiate (or Lizentiat) is the equivalent of a Master's degree (or between an M.Sc and PhD)
fluidistic
#5
Dec6-09, 10:38 PM
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Quote Quote by alxm View Post
Why? In most countries I know that have (or had) a degree by that name (e.g. Germany, Switzerland), a licentiate (or Lizentiat) is the equivalent of a Master's degree (or between an M.Sc and PhD)
You might be right, I didn't investigate about El Salvador. In France the "licence" lasts 3 years and is equivalent to a B.S., not a master.
In Argentina (where I live), it lasts 5 years for the physics degree, hence might be equivalent to a master.

Mira vos RadioactivMan! Vivo en Córdoba, vos?
scout6686
#6
Dec7-09, 12:20 AM
P: 47
You and me are in the same boat :)

I say get really good grades and get really good at MATH. That will give you a great foundation.

Try to go to a BIG university where there is lots of research being conducted.

Good luck!
RadioactivMan
#7
Dec7-09, 06:47 AM
P: 12
alxm, I think is equivalent to a master in Europe because is a 5 years degree and you need a final thesis to get the degree.

fluidistic, vivo en Rosario.
f95toli
#8
Dec7-09, 07:09 AM
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No a licentiate is actually usually something in-between an MSc and a Phd, although the details vary between countries.

I have an MSc in Engineering Physics (4.5 years as an undergraduate), a Licentiate in Physics (which I got after being a PhD student for about 2.5 years and writing a licentiate thesis) and a PhD in physics (and additional 2.5 years+a "proper" PhD thesis). This was in Sweden.

The Licentiate is often used as a "way out" for people who start a PhD but discover that they do not really want to become researchers after spending a couple of years as PhD student. It basically means that you do not have to commit to the full 4-5 years. In the group where I worked about half the students leave after getting a licentiate.

For student who decide to stay on and get a full PhD (like me) It is also an opportunity to evaluate the work you've been doing. The licentiate thesis is also a good starting point for the full PhD thesis (I was able to "recycle" much of of the introduction, basic theory etc). You also tend to become slightly more independent once have the licentiate degree, you've basically shown that that you have at least some idea about how to do research..
AlexES16
#9
Dec7-09, 09:42 AM
P: 193
Well the lincentiate is 5 years here. Thanks for the replies people. Hows the living a physicist and type of jobs?
fluidistic
#10
Dec7-09, 09:54 AM
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Quote Quote by f95toli View Post
No a licentiate is actually usually something in-between an MSc and a Phd, although the details vary between countries.
Not only the details: as I pointed in France it is nothing like something in-between an MSc and a Ph.d. It's a 3 years degree which allow you to follow with an MSc which lasts generally 2 years more. So that you earn an MSc within 5 years. While in Argentina you earn your licenciatura within 5 years. Hence the equivalence of the Argentine licenciatura with the French MSc.
For other countries, we can check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Licentiate#Portugal, but unfortunately El Salvador doesn't appear in the list. Furthermore I wasn't able to find the information on the Internet. Let's wait for AlexES16 to enlighten us...
AlexES16
#11
Dec7-09, 10:07 AM
P: 193
Quote Quote by f95toli View Post
No a licentiate is actually usually something in-between an MSc and a Phd, although the details vary between countries.

I have an MSc in Engineering Physics (4.5 years as an undergraduate), a Licentiate in Physics (which I got after being a PhD student for about 2.5 years and writing a licentiate thesis) and a PhD in physics (and additional 2.5 years+a "proper" PhD thesis). This was in Sweden.

The Licentiate is often used as a "way out" for people who start a PhD but discover that they do not really want to become researchers after spending a couple of years as PhD student. It basically means that you do not have to commit to the full 4-5 years. In the group where I worked about half the students leave after getting a licentiate.

For student who decide to stay on and get a full PhD (like me) It is also an opportunity to evaluate the work you've been doing. The licentiate thesis is also a good starting point for the full PhD thesis (I was able to "recycle" much of of the introduction, basic theory etc). You also tend to become slightly more independent once have the licentiate degree, you've basically shown that that you have at least some idea about how to do research..

Hello =). Well ill live you here the link to the university.

http://www.ues.edu.sv/facultades/inicio/index.html

I dont know why dont let me put other links,

So you go to Fac. de Ciencias Naturales y Matemática, next Escuela de Fisica, next Carreras, next Licenciatura en Fisica, next under Plan Tipo click on "mas" and you see the pensum.
AlexES16
#12
Dec7-09, 10:08 AM
P: 193
Quote Quote by fluidistic View Post
Not only the details: as I pointed in France it is nothing like something in-between an MSc and a Ph.d. It's a 3 years degree which allow you to follow with an MSc which lasts generally 2 years more. So that you earn an MSc within 5 years. While in Argentina you earn your licenciatura within 5 years. Hence the equivalence of the Argentine licenciatura with the French MSc.
For other countries, we can check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Licentiate#Portugal, but unfortunately El Salvador doesn't appear in the list. Furthermore I wasn't able to find the information on the Internet. Let's wait for AlexES16 to enlighten us...

Hello =). Well ill live you here the link to the university.

http://www.ues.edu.sv/facultades/inicio/index.html

I dont know why dont let me put other links,

So you go to Fac. de Ciencias Naturales y Matemática, next Escuela de Fisica, next Carreras, next Licenciatura en Fisica, n


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