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Magnitude of the maximum gravitational force

by onyxorca
Tags: force, gravitational, magnitude, maximum
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onyxorca
#1
Feb1-10, 02:50 PM
P: 20
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

A bowling ball (mass = 5.9 kg, radius = 0.11 m) and a billiard ball (mass = 0.36 kg, radius = 0.028 m) may each be treated as uniform spheres. What is the magnitude of the maximum gravitational force that each can exert on the other?

2. Relevant equations

F=-Gm1m2/r^2

3. The attempt at a solution

6.67*10^-11*5.9*.36/-(.11+.028)^2 = -7.43913043 10^-9 N

right?
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willem2
#2
Feb1-10, 02:58 PM
P: 1,396
Right. altough I don't think the minus sign is right.
onyxorca
#3
Feb1-10, 03:01 PM
P: 20
but that's the minus sign from the formula isn't it?

willem2
#4
Feb1-10, 03:38 PM
P: 1,396
Magnitude of the maximum gravitational force

Quote Quote by onyxorca View Post
but that's the minus sign from the formula isn't it?
The formula is usually given without a minus sign. The question also asks for the magnitude of the force, wich has to be positive.


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