Do Electrons Attract AND Repel?


by FeDeX_LaTeX
Tags: attract, electrons, repel
FeDeX_LaTeX
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#1
Feb23-10, 04:37 PM
P: 425
Bit confused here. Electrons repel each other because they both have negative charges. But wouldn't they also ATTRACT each other because of the force of gravity?

[itex]F_{g} = \frac {Gm_{1}m_{2}} {d^{2}}[/itex]

Do two electrons by this law have a force of gravity that attracts them? Is it possible to get two identically charged particles to ATTRACT if the force of gravity given by the above formula is GREATER than the repulsive electron force?
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torquil
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#2
Feb23-10, 04:45 PM
P: 640
Quote Quote by FeDeX_LaTeX View Post
Bit confused here. Electrons repel each other because they both have negative charges. But wouldn't they also ATTRACT each other because of the force of gravity?

[itex]F_{g} = \frac {Gm_{1}m_{2}} {d^{2}}[/itex]

Do two electrons by this law have a force of gravity that attracts them? Is it possible to get two identically charged particles to ATTRACT if the force of gravity given by the above formula is GREATER than the repulsive electron force?
Everything you say is correct. But for fundamental particles, the electric repulsion will always be much greater than the gravitational attraction. However, if you give the earth and moon each one electron charge, the gravitational attraction will still be dominant :-)
Torquil
Awatarn
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#3
Feb23-10, 04:50 PM
P: 25
You're correct. The electron repels each other because of the same charge but attracts because of the gravitational force. Both kinds of force obeys the square law (force is proportional to [tex]\frac{1}{r^2}[/tex]). Two things repelling or attracting depending on charge and mass of themselves.

Saad Ahmed
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#4
Feb7-12, 06:03 AM
P: 9

Do Electrons Attract AND Repel?


Why don't electrons in the same orbital repel each other
sophiecentaur
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#5
Feb7-12, 06:09 AM
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Quote Quote by Saad Ahmed View Post
Why don't electrons in the same orbital repel each other
Of course they do! In a simple 'pictorial' model, they keep as far from each other as possible - but they are, of course, attracted to the + nucleus at the same time, which keeps them from drifting away.
ZapperZ
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#6
Feb7-12, 07:23 AM
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Quote Quote by FeDeX_LaTeX View Post
Bit confused here. Electrons repel each other because they both have negative charges. But wouldn't they also ATTRACT each other because of the force of gravity?

[itex]F_{g} = \frac {Gm_{1}m_{2}} {d^{2}}[/itex]

Do two electrons by this law have a force of gravity that attracts them? Is it possible to get two identically charged particles to ATTRACT if the force of gravity given by the above formula is GREATER than the repulsive electron force?
1. Put two electrons at a fix distance from each other.

2. Compute the electrostatic force between them.

3. Compute the gravitational force between them.

4. COMPARE the magnitude of both forces and see which one DOMINATES!

zZ.
Saad Ahmed
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#7
Feb7-12, 10:28 AM
P: 9
Repulsive Forces in greater than Gravitational Force....
Than why electrons does repel each other in same Orbital?
i think due to opposite spin which create opposite magnetic field in btw Electrons As we know opposite Magnetic field of lines attracts each other.......
Saad Ahmed
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#8
Feb7-12, 10:39 AM
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why does an electron not collide with nucleus??
jtbell
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#9
Feb7-12, 10:41 AM
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Quote Quote by Saad Ahmed View Post
why does an electron not collide with nucleus??
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=511179
kmarinas86
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#10
Feb7-12, 11:09 AM
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For two like charges moving parallel at a relativistic speed, the magnetic component of the Lorentz force nearly cancels out the electric component of the Lorentz force. According to General Relativity, does the gravitational "force" increase, decrease, or remain the same when viewed from the rest frame of that system?
sophiecentaur
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#11
Feb7-12, 12:27 PM
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"Relativistic speed" relative to each other is zero, surely.


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