how to convert dc voltage into higher dc voltage using transformer????


by tefavolc
Tags: convert, transformer, voltage
tefavolc
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#1
Jul2-10, 08:09 AM
P: 29
i am tring to convert 9 volt dc into 120 volt dc , and i ve to use transformer ,,, the problem is the transformer must have input ac voltage as it work on flux variation . i think the solution is to convert the input dc into ac and then use bridge rectifer at the output to convert it agine into dc ,, but how can i convert the input dc into ac ???????
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broean01
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#2
Jul2-10, 08:15 AM
P: 22
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=193568
n.karthick
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#3
Jul2-10, 08:22 AM
P: 241
You can use boost converter to step up DC. Basic information can be found in wikipedia page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boost_converter

tefavolc
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#4
Jul2-10, 08:42 AM
P: 29

how to convert dc voltage into higher dc voltage using transformer????


Quote Quote by n.karthick View Post
You can use boost converter to step up DC. Basic information can be found in wikipedia page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boost_converter
is there an electronic devise for the boost converter ,,, or i ve to construct the circuit my self??
Quantum-lept
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#5
Jul2-10, 10:29 AM
P: 50
What power requirement do you need?

What power is available with 9v source?
tefavolc
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#6
Jul3-10, 06:47 AM
P: 29
Quote Quote by Quantum-lept View Post
What power requirement do you need?

What power is available with 9v source?
sry ,,but how can i know that ??
Redbelly98
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#7
Jul3-10, 06:55 AM
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Quote Quote by Quantum-lept View Post
What power requirement do you need?

What power is available with 9v source?
Quote Quote by tefavolc View Post
sry ,,but how can i know that ??
Another way of asking the question: what are you using for a 9V source? What will be connected to the 120V source?

Also, you'll need to know either the current or the power for both the 9V source and whatever is connected to the 120V source. These should be specified somewhere.

The more information you can provide about your project, the more likely you are to get useful advice.
tefavolc
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#8
Jul3-10, 07:50 AM
P: 29
i think i find a simple way here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_inverter
bassplayer142
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#9
Jul5-10, 01:15 AM
P: 422
A transformer works on the principle that the magnetic field is induced by the derivative of the flux. Basically, you need the alternating voltage for the device to work while dc voltage does not do this.
tefavolc
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#10
Jul6-10, 11:07 AM
P: 29
i ve reached a devise that convert the dc into ac ,,it depend on the unstable of transistor as beta changes so ic and ib changes making flux variation in the transformer coils(12v\220v) and produce ac voltage in the other terminal,,,, but the problem is when i measure Vout with R1=infinty it give value of 150 volt and when i change the value of R1 the voltage change with it directly .. how can i make the voltage constant what ever resistance i put??????
shokrn mokdamn (thnx in advance) :D
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Redbelly98
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#11
Jul6-10, 06:32 PM
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Quote Quote by tefavolc View Post
.. how can i make the voltage constant what ever resistance i put??????
You can't.

If you think you can, you shouldn't be working on 120V circuits. Instead, learn about electronics with lower voltage circuits first. It's a simple matter of your own safety.
tefavolc
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#12
Jul6-10, 08:27 PM
P: 29
Quote Quote by Redbelly98 View Post
You can't.
why??!!would u plz explain
Zryn
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#13
Jul6-10, 09:02 PM
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Using an isolated Flyback converter (or two) you could satisfy the constraints of "increasing a dc voltage by 'using' a transformer".
Keltin
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#14
Jul7-10, 11:08 AM
P: 3
.. how can i make the voltage constant what ever resistance i put??????

You'll have to increase the power capability of your DC source on the primary so that it can handle the load on the secondary.

Power is finite in this circuit. Let's say that your DC source can supply 100mW of power, and for simplicity, we'll assume a lossless transformer

P = V * I -> P/V = I

0.1 / 150 = 667 uA

So if your DC source can supply 100mW of power, the most current you could draw on your secondary would be 667 micro-amps to sustain 150V

V = I * R -> R = V/I

150 / 667^-6 = 224887 ~ 224k

So your biggest load would have to be equal to or greater than 224k. If you increased the load beyond that (lowered the resistance so that current increased), your voltage level would drop. For example, assume a 100k load.

150 / 100k = 1.5 mA

P = V * I -> V = P/I

In this example, we have said the max power your source can supply is 100 mA, so:

V = 0.1 / 1.5^-3 = 66.7V

As you can see, you have exceeded the max power of your source, and your voltage levels took a hit and fell from 150V to 66V.

To make this simpler, check your load and see how much power it consumes. If you're plugging in a TV or a space heater, see how many Watts it consumes and then make sure your DC source on the primary can supply that many Watts.
Redbelly98
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#15
Jul7-10, 05:35 PM
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Quote Quote by tefavolc View Post
how can i make the voltage constant what ever resistance i put??????
shokrn mokdamn (thnx in advance) :D
Quote Quote by Redbelly98 View Post
You can't.
Quote Quote by tefavolc View Post
why??!!would u plz explain
Every voltage supply has a maximum output current. If you choose R small enough so that Vout/R is larger than that maximum current, the output voltage must drop to a lower value.

Since I have answered your question, could you return the courtesy and answer mine?
Quote Quote by Redbelly98 View Post
what are you using for a 9V source? What will be connected to the 120V source?
tefavolc
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#16
Jul7-10, 05:59 PM
P: 29
Quote Quote by Redbelly98 View Post
Every voltage supply has a maximum output current. If you choose R small enough so that Vout/R is larger than that maximum current, the output voltage must drop to a lower value.

Since I have answered your question, could you return the courtesy and answer mine?
im using for 9 volt source an (9volt battry panasonic)....i will not connect spceific thing just test the output on variable resistance to see the output power,, i just want to built that devise for knowlage and experince ,, and later i can connect it to some devise which need high input voltage..

thnx for you all for helping me :)) :))
Quantum-lept
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#17
Jul8-10, 04:28 PM
P: 50
some info on pwr supplies...
http://www.electronics-project-desig...rSupplies.html

can you read a schematic?...

remember the goal of electrical experimentation: No smoke, no sparks, and No Fire!... (;


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