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Resultant Amplitude of 2 Waves

by jegues
Tags: amplitude, resultant, waves
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jegues
#1
Apr17-11, 04:04 PM
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1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

Two sinusoidal waves have the same angular frequency, the same amplitude ym, and travel in the same direction in the same medium. If they differ in phase by 50 degrees, the amplitude of the resultant wave is?

2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution

How do I go about figuring this out? Do I need to use phasors?

[tex]\sqrt{(1+cos(50))^{2} + (sin(50))^{2}}[/tex]

Isn't the superposition of 2 waves y1(x,t) and y2(x,t)

y'(x,t) = y1(x,t)+y2(x,t)

?

Thanks again!
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Redbelly98
#2
Apr18-11, 01:09 PM
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Quote Quote by jegues View Post
[b]

3. The attempt at a solution

How do I go about figuring this out? Do I need to use phasors?

[tex]\sqrt{(1+cos(50))^{2} + (sin(50))^{2}}[/tex]
Yes, that method works well here.

Isn't the superposition of 2 waves y1(x,t) and y2(x,t)

y'(x,t) = y1(x,t)+y2(x,t)

?
Yes, that's right.


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