Test Stability using Routh Stability Method


by mym786
Tags: method, routh, stability, test
mym786
mym786 is offline
#1
Jul17-11, 02:06 AM
P: 11
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

For a control system that has G(s)H(s) = [itex]\frac{1}{s^{2}*(s+\alpha)}[/itex]


2. Relevant equations

1 + G(s)H(s) = 0

3. The attempt at a solution

Exam question i messed up . I really need to know the answer.
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CEL
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#2
Jul18-11, 01:28 PM
P: 639
Quote Quote by mym786 View Post
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

For a control system that has G(s)H(s) = [itex]\frac{1}{s^{2}*(s+\alpha)}[/itex]


2. Relevant equations

1 + G(s)H(s) = 0

3. The attempt at a solution

Exam question i messed up . I really need to know the answer.
i + G(s)H(s) = 0 means:
[tex]s^3+\alpha s^2 + 1 = 0[/tex]
Since the polynomial is incomplete (there is no term in [tex]s^1[/tex]) there is at least one root in the RHP and the system is unstable. No need to use Routh algorithm.
mym786
mym786 is offline
#3
Jul19-11, 01:05 AM
P: 11
I forgot one more thing. It also says find the value of [itex]\alpha[/itex] for which the system can be classified in the critically stable state.


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