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Angular acceleration problem

by seboastien
Tags: acceleration, angular
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seboastien
#1
Aug18-11, 05:24 AM
P: 53
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

angular acceleration of line a= -2w^2 rad/s

when theta=pi/6, w= 10 rad/s

what is angular velocity when theta= pi/3?

2. Relevant equations

chain rule

3. The attempt at a solution

w= e^-2theta is my answer, but I know this is wrong

I know that this question is really easy, but I just don't know how to get it
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rock.freak667
#2
Aug18-11, 05:38 AM
HW Helper
P: 6,208
Well you should know that α= -2ω2 means that dω/dt = -2ω2

which is an easily solvable DE once you 'separate the variables' i.e. put all the things with ω on one side and t on the other then integrate both sides.
seboastien
#3
Aug18-11, 05:42 AM
P: 53
But then I end up with t=1/2w, how do I find the rest of the answer?

seboastien
#4
Aug18-11, 06:06 AM
P: 53
Angular acceleration problem

Someone please help me!!!!
rock.freak667
#5
Aug18-11, 08:32 AM
HW Helper
P: 6,208
Quote Quote by seboastien View Post
But then I end up with t=1/2w, how do I find the rest of the answer?
I now saw that you have ω and θ so forget my above post and replace α with ω*dω/dθ and integrate again. Do not forget the constant of integration which you can find with the conditions they gave you.
seboastien
#6
Aug18-11, 09:55 AM
P: 53
Yes, that was my problem all along... I forgot to add the constant!! Thanks.


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