Geometry Problem


by tomtomtom1
Tags: geometry
tomtomtom1
tomtomtom1 is offline
#1
Dec16-12, 01:35 PM
P: 30
Hi all

I work on the rail roads and I am trying to solve a geometry problem which I was hoping someone could help me with.

My problem is this:-

I have a straight rail road. At point A trains can divert onto another road, the other road is curved with a radius (R1), the curvature of the road changes to R2.

If I was to continue to travel along the straight rail road then what would be the offset from some distance travelled along the straight (AB) to the top of the 2nd curve.

In simple terms how is offset BC calculated.

Iím not much of a mathís wiz so I could really use a hand. I have made a drawing to illustrate what I am trying to calculate.

I really want to understand where and how it is calculated.

Can anyone shed any light?

Thanks guys
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Circle Problem.pdf (24.1 KB, 21 views)
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huntoon
huntoon is offline
#2
Dec16-12, 02:22 PM
P: 145
Would Pythagoras work?
CL2 = AB2 + BC2

.. BC= √(CL2-AB2)



(this is just a quick little stab at the problem).
Studiot
Studiot is offline
#3
Dec16-12, 02:42 PM
P: 5,462
I am assuming from your description that AB is tangent to the first circle at A.

The perpendicular offsets from a tangent to circular curve are given by

Offset = (length along tangent)2 / twice radius

This will get you as far as D.

At D I'm not sure what happens.

Are you saying that at D the two circles have a common tangent?

Or do you need to insert a transition curve between the circles?

http://physicsforums.com/showthread....ghlight=offset

tomtomtom1
tomtomtom1 is offline
#4
Dec16-12, 02:58 PM
P: 30

Geometry Problem


Thats correct at D both circles share a common tangent.

Quote Quote by Studiot View Post
I am assuming from your description that AB is tangent to the first circle at A.

The perpendicular offsets from a tangent to circular curve are given by

Offset = (length along tangent)2 / twice radius

This will get you as far as D.

At D I'm not sure what happens.

Are you saying that at D the two circles have a common tangent?

Or do you need to insert a transition curve between the circles?
Studiot
Studiot is offline
#5
Dec16-12, 03:10 PM
P: 5,462
So once you know where D is, you can use the same method to get to C.


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