Is it possible to be completely still in space?


by Jd0g33
Tags: completely, space
Jd0g33
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Jan31-13, 02:56 PM
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So we are on a rotating planet, which also hurdles through space orbiting the sun, which also is hurdling through space orbiting the center of the galaxy. Is it possible to be motionless in space?
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phinds
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Jan31-13, 02:59 PM
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Quote Quote by lundyjb View Post
So we are on a rotating planet, which also hurdles through space orbiting the sun, which also is hurdling through space orbiting the center of the galaxy. Is it possible to be motionless in space?
Relative to what? Motion is relative. If you are searching for an absolute frame of reference, there isn't one.
Endervhar
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Jan31-13, 05:24 PM
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If you are searching for an absolute frame of reference, there isn't one.
What about the cosmic microwave background; could that not be considered as an absolute F of R?

phinds
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Jan31-13, 05:33 PM
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Is it possible to be completely still in space?


Quote Quote by Endervhar View Post
What about the cosmic microwave background; could that not be considered as an absolute F of R?
No, there is not such thing as an absolute frame of reference. You can state the Earth's velocity (or anything else's velocity if you wish) relative to the CMB, but it is not an absolute velocity in any sense.
Drakkith
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Jan31-13, 05:33 PM
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Quote Quote by Endervhar View Post
What about the cosmic microwave background; could that not be considered as an absolute F of R?
Ask yourself this. What does "absolute reference frame" mean?
The_Duck
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Jan31-13, 05:34 PM
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Quote Quote by Endervhar View Post
What about the cosmic microwave background; could that not be considered as an absolute F of R?
The CMB does define a frame of reference, but the laws of physics don't single out that frame of reference as special.


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