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Wind pressure

by jacques dichi
Tags: pressure, wind
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jacques dichi
#1
Mar15-13, 10:21 AM
P: 9
Hi forumers,

I've got a question,and of course all proper answers are welcome,
I think however a sailboat designer/engineer would quickly know
what I'm talking about.
I'd like to know what is the pressure/push of a 10 mph (16 km/h)
wind on 12,000 sq.mt. surface ,and how to figure this out if I change
the parameters ?
Thks. & Happy Easter
J.D.
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russ_watters
#2
Mar18-13, 07:08 PM
Mentor
P: 22,237
You can use Bernoulli's equation to calculate the stagnation pressure at that wind speed.
jacques dichi
#3
Mar19-13, 12:04 AM
P: 9
Thk. u Russ for yr. reply I'll try bernoulli as suggested - if he fails me - I'll come back to u

sci-phy
#4
Mar23-13, 04:51 AM
P: 17
Wind pressure

Hey,

It depends on the surface you are talking about. If it is a sail, then it can deform so that the velocity of the wind is practically zero on the sail surface. So Bernoulli's principle would hold good. But if it is a rigid surface, the wind will get deflected and the force is based on Newton's 2nd law. Besides, this value also changes with the direction of wind and speed of the boat(or surface) and compression of air.
Do let me know if you want a general equation for the same :)
jacques dichi
#5
Mar23-13, 06:01 AM
P: 9
Quote Quote by sci-phy View Post
Hey,

It depends on the surface you are talking about. If it is a sail, then it can deform so that the velocity of the wind is practically zero on the sail surface. So Bernoulli's principle would hold good. But if it is a rigid surface, the wind will get deflected and the force is based on Newton's 2nd law. Besides, this value also changes with the direction of wind and speed of the boat(or surface) and compression of air.
Do let me know if you want a general equation for the same :)
thks. for your answer. - I think according to it I might have misled a few people with the phrasing of the question or my comparison - sorry for that.
What I have is a 120m. span 3 wing wind turbine -approx. 12,000 m^2 surface - it does not deform like a sail and it is not rigid like a wall although when rotating it could be considered as such - and a 10 mph wind.
If I decrease the surface,how have I got to increase the wind in order to obtain the same "pressure/push" ?
Pls. bear with me,
Thks.


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