Register to reply

Is there a dominant colour in our universe?

by wolram
Tags: colour, dominant, universe
Share this thread:
wolram
#1
Aug19-05, 11:45 AM
PF Gold
wolram's Avatar
P: 3,685
It may be a strange question, Is there a dominant colour in our universe?
ignoring black and white. I have looked but can not find any thing.
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles
Tiny particles have big potential in debate over nuclear proliferation
Ray tracing and beyond
mezarashi
#2
Aug19-05, 11:48 AM
HW Helper
P: 660
Color? The concept of color comes from the way our eyes work. Since we can view a range of electromagnetic radiation known as the 'visible spectrum', we've assigned names to different frequencies. So are you suggesting that a certain frequency within this very limited visible range is more commonly emitted?
wolram
#3
Aug19-05, 11:55 AM
PF Gold
wolram's Avatar
P: 3,685
Yes, as a guess i would say blue then red, after searching through random pictures.

mezarashi
#4
Aug19-05, 01:20 PM
HW Helper
P: 660
Is there a dominant colour in our universe?

That just doesn't sound very justified... or scientific atleast, considering you were using the "universe" as your domain, random pictures on google are just things relatively earthly.
honestrosewater
#5
Aug19-05, 01:43 PM
PF Gold
honestrosewater's Avatar
P: 2,330
Would it be reasonable to look to the colors emitted by stars?
SpaceTiger
#6
Aug19-05, 01:48 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
SpaceTiger's Avatar
P: 2,977
Is there a dominant colour in our universe?

Is this what you had in mind?

As was already said, color is to some extent a result of how the human eye works, particularly the colors you listed (black and white). There are some colors, however, that can be roughly matched up with a particular wavelength of light. Red and blue, for example, correspond roughly to 800 and 400 nm, respectively. The color derived above is just sort of an average that we would see if we were to view all of the light of the universe at once. It's not a constant because the universe is evolving with time (it mostly gets more red), but it won't have changed much in the past billion years.
wolram
#7
Aug19-05, 02:37 PM
PF Gold
wolram's Avatar
P: 3,685
Exactly thanks Space Tiger.
wolram
#8
Aug19-05, 02:40 PM
PF Gold
wolram's Avatar
P: 3,685
Quote Quote by mezarashi
That just doesn't sound very justified... or scientific atleast, considering you were using the "universe" as your domain, random pictures on google are just things relatively earthly.
Sorry i meant random pictures of stars.
Mk
#9
Aug21-05, 12:43 AM
P: 2,056
What range of

A) electromagnetic frequencies
and/or
B) electromagnetic frequencies we can see

are MOST commonly found in the universe?

How's that?
SpaceTiger
#10
Aug21-05, 12:58 AM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
SpaceTiger's Avatar
P: 2,977
Quote Quote by Mk
What range of

A) electromagnetic frequencies
and/or
B) electromagnetic frequencies we can see

are MOST commonly found in the universe?

How's that?
The CMB is the dominant form (by energy density) of radiation in the universe. It's at millimeter wavelengths. The dominant form of optical light, as can be seen in the link I gave, is in an emission line at around 650 nm, which is red light. This is the Balmer alpha line of hydrogen, commonly seen in regions with heavy star formation activity.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Sky a different colour General Discussion 12
What Colour is your Hat? Fun, Photos & Games 21
Buy paint for the offices General Discussion 13
What happens to the remainder of the energy General Physics 3
Eye Colour Biology 6