Register to reply

Do Fish Have Brains?

by Iacchus32
Tags: brains, fish
Share this thread:
Iacchus32
#1
Sep24-05, 01:33 PM
Iacchus32's Avatar
P: 2,216
Do fish have brains? It's a simple enough question isn't it? Cleary if fish exist -- as a "structure" -- and, fish have brains -- within that "stucture" -- we must consider the whole of the fish, when referring to the intelligence and, structure of that fish. Correct? So, in what way does structure not serve, and hence coincide, with intelligence? Indeed, how does it vary from the structure of the Universe, when viewed as a (structured) system as a whole?

Now, does this mean I'm saying we as human beings are the articulators of the Universe? No it does not. I am merely asking if it's possible to separate intelligence from structure. In other words, how does intelligence in fact "arrive," without its contingency upon structure as its basis? And, where we may recognize intelligence within the brain, as the epitome or, "final outcropping" of that structure, does that mean the rest of the system does not entail intelligence?

Surely we couldn't argue this in the case with a fish!
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Bees able to spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing
Classic Lewis Carroll character inspires new ecological model
When cooperation counts: Researchers find sperm benefit from grouping together in mice
Iacchus32
#2
Sep24-05, 08:50 PM
Iacchus32's Avatar
P: 2,216
Note: For anyone who may be thrown by the original post, the first question was more rhetorical, and was in response to a question someone else had posed elsewhere, regarding the nature of structure versus intelligence. Obviously, fish do have brains. Okay?

Thanks.
Dayle Record
#3
Sep27-05, 10:22 PM
P: 464
Watching large schools of fish swim in perfect unison, makes me think that they are electrically sensitive, or telepathic, or have some large "group mind thing" that they do. Fish look to be so much a part of their environment, and their group dynamics are miraculous. They seem possessed of strong instinct and will, and function in an incredibly reflexive fashion. They can be amazingly defensive, and then so driven they seem reckless, yet I think that each species and specialized subspecies is an entire entity, so the loss of one is like the loss of a part of a whole.

There is a place that is a spring area in the high Uinta mountains of Utah. A special golden trout lives there. They are cagey, and on that white sand bottom, looking up through the shallows they inhabit, nothing is missed. They are not to be caught, but I love watching their shadows.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Fish in a Fish bowl? Advanced Physics Homework 1
Marlboro cigarettes is sponsoring a contest with a million dollar priz Fun, Photos & Games 7
10% of our brains. General Discussion 11
Need help from the Big Brains Introductory Physics Homework 21
Big fish small fish General Discussion 14