Ancient Shipbuilding: Prehistoric Roots Revealed

  • Thread starter wolram
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Roots
In summary, ancient shipbuilding has its roots in prehistoric times, as evidenced by the discovery of dugout canoes dating back to 8,000 BC. These early vessels were used for fishing and transportation, but as societies evolved, shipbuilding techniques became more advanced and ships were used for trade, exploration, and warfare. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks were known for their advanced shipbuilding techniques, while the Vikings were renowned for their sturdy and versatile longships. Shipbuilding played a crucial role in the development of civilizations and continues to be an important industry today.
  • #1
wolram
Gold Member
Dearly Missed
4,446
558
This was on tv today, it seems to me that boat building could stretch way back into pre history.
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/39810/title/Shipwrecks_harbor_evidence_of_ancient_sophistication

PHILADELPHIA — Surprising insights about ancient shipbuilding have floated to the surface from the submerged remnants of two major harbors, one on Israel’s coast and the other bordering Istanbul, Turkey. Researchers described their finds January 9 at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Analyses of salvaged crafts indicate that shipbuilders started making sophisticated frames for their vessels by about 1,500 years ago, 500 years earlier than had been suspected, reported Yaakov Kahanov of the University of Haifa in Israel. By a few hundred years later, craft constructors had steadily improved hull designs for a diverse collection of ships, says Cemal Pulak of Texas A&M University in College Station.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
wolram said:
This was on tv today, it seems to me that boat building could stretch way back into pre history.
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/39810/title/Shipwrecks_harbor_evidence_of_ancient_sophistication

PHILADELPHIA — Surprising insights about ancient shipbuilding have floated to the surface from the submerged remnants of two major harbors, one on Israel’s coast and the other bordering Istanbul, Turkey. Researchers described their finds January 9 at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America.

Analyses of salvaged crafts indicate that shipbuilders started making sophisticated frames for their vessels by about 1,500 years ago, 500 years earlier than had been suspected, reported Yaakov Kahanov of the University of Haifa in Israel. By a few hundred years later, craft constructors had steadily improved hull designs for a diverse collection of ships, says Cemal Pulak of Texas A&M University in College Station.

Hi wolram,

You may be surprised to find that harbours for large ships have existed long before 2000 years ago. For instance, have you seen the ships buried beside the Gaza Plataeu Pyramids? (these are at least 5000 years old)

http://ashrafegyptguide.com/SolarBoat-2-large-web.jpg

Also, the harbour that was constructed in Cambay India, but is now 120 feet underwater... after the last glacial maximum "meltwater" pulse was designed for large, trading ships. Perhaps I'm mis combobulating what you're saying. Do you mean "really complicated" ship hulls?

(A collection of colossal underwater structures)

http://www.sawse.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/03/33.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
baywax said:
Hi wolram,

You may be surprised to find that harbours for large ships have existed long before 2000 years ago. For instance, have you seen the ships buried beside the Gaza Plataeu Pyramids?

Also, the harbour that was constructed in Cambay India, but is now 120 feet underwater... after the last glacial maximum "meltwater" pulse was designed for large, trading ships. Perhaps I'm mis combobulating what you're saying. Do you mean "really complicated" ship hulls?

Well let's say more than a dug out, the Cambay India thing sounds interesting, i will enjoy looking that up, thanks.
 
  • #4
wolram said:
Well let's say more than a dug out, the Cambay India thing sounds interesting, i will enjoy looking that up, thanks.

We cannot rule out the Phoenicians who built sea worthy ships as long ago as 7000 years bp. If you look at some of their designs these might fit your criteria for a "sophisticated" hull.

Check this out...

http://www.phoenicia.org.uk/discovering-theship.htm
 

Related to Ancient Shipbuilding: Prehistoric Roots Revealed

1. What is the significance of studying ancient shipbuilding?

Ancient shipbuilding is important because it provides insight into the technological advancements and capabilities of civilizations in the past. It also helps us understand their trade routes, navigation techniques, and cultural exchanges.

2. How were ancient ships constructed?

Ancient ships were typically built using a technique called "shell-first" construction. This involved creating a skeleton frame of the ship and then attaching planks or boards to create the outer shell. The planks were then sealed with tar or pitch to make the ship waterproof.

3. What materials were used in ancient shipbuilding?

The materials used in ancient shipbuilding varied depending on the location and time period. Some common materials included wood, such as cedar or oak, as well as animal hides, reeds, and even animal bones. In some cases, metal was also used for reinforcement and fittings.

4. How did ancient civilizations navigate their ships?

Ancient civilizations used a variety of navigation techniques, including celestial navigation, using stars and constellations to determine direction, and magnetic compasses. They also relied on landmarks, such as coastlines and islands, and their knowledge of ocean currents and winds to guide their ships.

5. What can we learn from the recent discoveries about prehistoric shipbuilding?

The recent discoveries about prehistoric shipbuilding have revealed that ancient civilizations were capable of building complex and advanced ships much earlier than previously thought. These discoveries also shed light on the cultural connections and trade networks of prehistoric societies, providing a deeper understanding of our shared human history.

Back
Top