Can I self-study classical mechanics and still graduate with a physics degree?

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In summary, self-studying classical mechanics is possible and can have several benefits, such as flexibility and the development of critical thinking skills. There are many resources available for self-study, and it is important to regularly test oneself and seek feedback to ensure understanding. However, self-study may not be enough on its own to prepare for a physics degree, and additional courses and laboratory work may be necessary.
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physicsnmathstudent0
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How did you find PF?
By searching a question of orbits and escape velocity
Hello, I'm an undergrad physics student who after a lot of struggle (that it is still going) is going to graduate this year! yay! I'm studying classical mechanics on my own and I'm a little rusty but I want to give my best to finally graduate. I also have two beautiful dogs c:
 
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physicsnmathstudent0 said:
How did you find PF?: By searching a question of orbits and escape velocity

Hello, I'm a undergrad physics student who after a lot of struggle (that it is still going) is going to graduate this year! yay! I'm studying classical mechanics on my own and I'm a little rusty but I want to give my best to finally graduate. I also have two beautiful dogs c:
Welcome to Physics Forums. You'll learn a lot here.
 
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dlgoff said:
Welcome to Physics Forums. You'll learn a lot here.
Thank you!
 
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physicsnmathstudent0 said:
Thank you!
I've been a member since 2003 and I feel like I've gotten a Masters degree in Physics and Electrical Engineering (thanks to @berkeman).
 
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physicsnmathstudent0 said:
How did you find PF?: By searching a question of orbits and escape velocity

going to graduate this year! yay!
Congrats! Welcome to PF. :smile:
 
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dlgoff said:
I've been a member since 2003 and I feel like I've gotten a Masters degree in Physics and Electrical Engineering (thanks to @berkeman).
jajaja I love it
 
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berkeman said:
Congrats! Welcome to PF. :smile:
Thank you! c:
 
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Related to Can I self-study classical mechanics and still graduate with a physics degree?

1. Can I self-study classical mechanics and still graduate with a physics degree?

Yes, it is possible to self-study classical mechanics and still graduate with a physics degree. However, it is important to keep in mind that self-studying requires a lot of dedication and discipline, and it may be challenging to cover all the necessary material without guidance from a teacher or professor.

2. What are the benefits of self-studying classical mechanics?

Self-studying classical mechanics can have several benefits, including the flexibility to learn at your own pace, the ability to focus on specific topics or areas of interest, and the opportunity to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

3. Are there any resources available for self-studying classical mechanics?

Yes, there are many resources available for self-studying classical mechanics, such as textbooks, online lectures and tutorials, practice problems, and study guides. It is important to choose reliable and reputable sources for your self-study to ensure that you are learning accurate and relevant material.

4. How can I make sure I am understanding the material correctly while self-studying classical mechanics?

One way to ensure that you are understanding the material correctly is to regularly test yourself with practice problems and quizzes. You can also seek feedback from peers or join online study groups to discuss and clarify any confusing concepts.

5. Is self-studying classical mechanics enough to prepare me for a physics degree?

Self-studying classical mechanics can provide a solid foundation for a physics degree, but it may not be sufficient on its own. It is important to also take courses and engage in hands-on laboratory work to gain a comprehensive understanding of the subject and prepare for higher-level physics courses.

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