Depressurization in Space: Estimating Time and Effects of Meteor Penetration

  • Thread starter GTOM
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Space
In summary, the conversation discusses the effects of a meteor penetrating the hull of the International Space Station (ISS) and a spacesuit. It is mentioned that the depressurization time would depend on factors such as the size of the hole and the pressure inside the ISS. The conversation also touches on the possibility of a wound causing intense bleeding and damage to organs in space. It is noted that human skin can withstand a drop in pressure, but the extent of damage if the skin is also damaged is unknown. The conversation ends with a question about the expected time for depressurization to occur.
  • #1
GTOM
955
64
My first question : let's suppose that a centimeter meteor penetrated the hull of ISS.
Roughly, how much time depressurization would take?

Second, if a small meteor penetrates the spacesuit of an astronaut and wound him in space (with a small puncture like wound), any estimation how much time till he bleeds out? Would that intense blood sprinkle damage the organs as well?
 
Astronomy news on Phys.org
  • #2
ISS is 916 m^3 at 1 atm. At what pressure is 'depressurization'? The hole geometry is the next most influential parameter. With a small enough wound, there is no need for him to bleed out at all.
 
  • #3
"At what pressure is 'depressurization'? "

Lower than the Armstrong limit 6.3 kPa.

"The hole geometry is the next most influential parameter. " I thought about a really nasty situation of an eye damage.
So a wound with a similar diameter as the eye.
 
  • #5
"human skin is tough enough to withstand the drop of one atmosphere"

Yes, but is there any info, or estimation, what happens if the skin is also damaged? Inner pressure will quickly pump the blood out of the body, is it simple intense bleeding, or somewhat worse (hydrodinamic damages etc)?
 
  • #6
Doug Huffman said:
ISS is 916 m^3 at 1 atm. At what pressure is 'depressurization'? The hole geometry is the next most influential parameter. With a small enough wound, there is no need for him to bleed out at all.

Can i reasonably expect, that depressurization take a few minutes?
(As pressure falls, less and less force push the air out, i guess it would be some kind of integration.)
 

1. What is depressurization in space?

Depressurization in space refers to the sudden decrease in air pressure in a spacecraft or space station. This can occur due to a variety of causes, such as a breach in the hull or a malfunctioning airlock.

2. How does depressurization affect astronauts?

Depressurization can have serious effects on astronauts, including hypoxia (oxygen deprivation), decompression sickness, and tissue and organ damage. It can also result in immediate death if the pressure drops low enough.

3. What safety measures are in place to prevent depressurization?

Spacecraft and space stations have multiple layers of protection to prevent depressurization, including reinforced hulls, redundant systems, and emergency procedures. Astronauts also undergo extensive training to address emergency situations like depressurization.

4. How is depressurization treated in space?

If a spacecraft or space station experiences depressurization, the first step is to seal off any affected areas and stabilize the remaining pressure. Astronauts may also need to use oxygen masks or suits, and may undergo medical treatment upon returning to Earth.

5. Can depressurization be simulated on Earth?

Yes, depressurization can be simulated in specialized chambers on Earth for training purposes. These chambers can mimic the effects of low air pressure and allow astronauts to practice emergency procedures and experience the physical effects of depressurization in a controlled environment.

Similar threads

  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
7
Views
967
  • Aerospace Engineering
Replies
5
Views
3K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
5K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
3
Replies
96
Views
5K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
21
Views
959
  • Art, Music, History, and Linguistics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top