Did Greenpeace's Controversial Stunt at Ancient Site Cross the Line?

  • Thread starter nsaspook
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Thinking
In summary, Greenpeace has caused some damage to an ancient Peruvian site and is now receiving backlash.
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
nsaspook said:
What were they thinking?
I do not accept the premise of that question.
 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc, nsaspook and lisab
  • #3
Humanity is littered with lost souls like these - people who believe they're on truth's side. Such certitude nearly always results in clusters like this one.
 
  • #4
B4a2ed3IAAA6j1i.png

Footprints?
http://elcomercio.pe/peru/pais/line...s-greenpeace-son-irreparables-noticia-1777541
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Who gave Greenpeace the right to defile this pristine archeological treasure?
 
  • #6
Lol. I watched the video and thought, what's so bad about this, looks kinda cool. And then I saw the link to the NYT article. That kinda changed the equation. Obviously some bone-head maneuver unless they knew what they were doing. I sure hope they didn't.
 
  • Like
Likes Silicon Waffle
  • #7
It's not stupid. It's evil. There's a difference.
 
  • Like
Likes mheslep
  • #8
No, stupid is all it takes. Evil actually implies intelligence.
 
  • #9
Could have achieved the same thing with Photoshop.
 
  • #10
Aaronvan said:
Could have achieved the same thing with Photoshop.

Some say that any publicity is good publicity. They did get their name in the papers after all. (If they thought this that far through then they are evil after all.)
 
  • #11
Vanadium 50 said:
It's not stupid. It's evil. There's a difference.
Robert J. Hanlon said:
Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.
Hanlon's[/PLAIN] [Broken] razor.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #12
Algr said:
Some say that any publicity is good publicity. They did get their name in the papers after all. (If they thought this that far through then they are evil after all.)

Well, when you're Greenpeace and your brand ostensibly stands for "conservation," then there is something called bad publicity, and I think this qualifies.
 

1. What is the meaning behind someone's actions, and how can we know what they were thinking?

This is a difficult question to answer definitively, as it depends on the individual and their specific thought processes. However, there are a few common ways that scientists and psychologists try to understand the motivations behind people's actions. One approach is to study their behavior and look for patterns or underlying factors that may have influenced their decisions. Another is to conduct surveys or experiments to gather data on people's thoughts and feelings. Ultimately, understanding someone's thoughts and actions may require a combination of these methods and a deep understanding of human psychology.

2. Can we ever truly know what someone else was thinking?

It is impossible to fully know what someone else was thinking, as we can never fully enter another person's mind. However, through observation, communication, and research, we can gain insights into their thought processes and make educated guesses about their motivations. Additionally, individuals may not always be fully aware of their own thoughts and may not be able to accurately articulate them, making it even more challenging to understand their inner workings.

3. How do factors like culture and upbringing influence someone's thought processes and actions?

Culture and upbringing can have a significant impact on someone's thought processes and actions. The beliefs, values, and norms of a person's cultural background can shape their worldview and influence their decision-making. Similarly, their upbringing and life experiences can also impact their thoughts and behaviors. Understanding these influences can help us better understand why someone may act the way they do.

4. Are there any biological or neurological factors that contribute to someone's thought processes?

Yes, there are many biological and neurological factors that can affect someone's thought processes and actions. For example, certain hormones and neurotransmitters can impact mood and decision-making. Additionally, brain structure and function can also play a role in shaping thoughts and behaviors. Studying these biological and neurological factors can provide valuable insights into human thought processes.

5. How do emotions play a role in someone's thought processes and decision-making?

Emotions are closely linked to thought processes and decision-making. They can influence the way we perceive and interpret information, as well as how we respond to different situations. Emotions can also serve as a motivator for action. For example, someone may make a decision based on fear, anger, or happiness. Understanding the role of emotions in thought processes can help us better understand and predict human behavior.

Suggested for: Did Greenpeace's Controversial Stunt at Ancient Site Cross the Line?

Replies
18
Views
674
Replies
6
Views
712
Replies
38
Views
3K
Replies
18
Views
956
Replies
2
Views
841
Replies
1
Views
815
Back
Top