Do particles know their destination before setting out?

  • Thread starter p764rds
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Particles
In summary: So the problem of calculating a path in a best case scenario would be reduced to the problem of solving a system of linear equations.
  • #1
p764rds
167
0
Lets assume we want to calculate a path for a particle for a best path
scenario from one place to another.

Particle A can collide with nearby particles B or C - depending on where B and C are,
but B and C may collide with D or E and, again D or E may collide with particles F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M.
But particles F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M may collide with...

The routing calculation is a polynomial nightmare even for a large computer,
- would need one bigger than the universe etc etc.

If the quantum states of the particles involved in collisions knew their destinations before setting off
(by FTL quantum state communication), would that help in solving this polynomial traveling salesman problem?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
You may want to look into many-body physics. Such detailed knowledge is not necessary (or may not even be relevant) in various emergent phenomena. The many-body ground state doesn't care about such detailed in, say, arriving at superconductivity, for example.

Zz.
 
  • #3
p764rds said:
Lets assume we want to calculate a path for a particle for a best path
scenario from one place to another.

Particle A can collide with nearby particles B or C - depending on where B and C are,
but B and C may collide with D or E and, again D or E may collide with particles F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M.
But particles F,G,H,I,J,K,L,M may collide with...

The routing calculation is a polynomial nightmare even for a large computer,
- would need one bigger than the universe etc etc.

If the quantum states of the particles involved in collisions knew their destinations before setting off
(by FTL quantum state communication), would that help in solving this polynomial traveling salesman problem?

This view of particles moving like billiard balls and colliding from time to time is deeply mistaken. Quantum particles interact through long-range fields (at least in the EM-case). The particle always "know" about each other just like in the case of gravity.
 

What is the concept of particles knowing their destination before setting out?

The concept of particles knowing their destination before setting out is based on the idea that particles, such as photons, electrons, and atoms, have predetermined paths and destinations that they follow in nature. This theory suggests that particles have some sort of intelligence or consciousness that guides them towards their intended destination.

Is there any evidence to support the idea of particles knowing their destination?

While there is no concrete evidence to support the idea of particles knowing their destination, there are some experiments that suggest particles may have predetermined paths. For example, the double-slit experiment showed that particles behave differently when observed, indicating that they may have some sort of knowledge of their surroundings. However, more research is needed to fully understand this concept.

How does the concept of particles knowing their destination relate to quantum mechanics?

The concept of particles knowing their destination is closely related to the principles of quantum mechanics, which study the behavior and interactions of particles at the atomic and subatomic level. Some theories in quantum mechanics, such as the Copenhagen interpretation, suggest that particles have predetermined paths and destinations. However, there are other interpretations that do not support this idea.

What are some alternative explanations for the behavior of particles?

While the concept of particles knowing their destination is one possible explanation for their behavior, there are other theories and interpretations that offer alternative explanations. For instance, some scientists believe that the behavior of particles is simply a result of random chance and probability, rather than predetermined paths. Others propose that particles may be influenced by unknown forces or factors in their environment.

How does this concept impact our understanding of the universe?

The idea of particles knowing their destination can have significant implications for our understanding of the universe and the laws of nature. If particles do have predetermined paths and destinations, it could challenge our current understanding of causality and determinism. It could also lead to new insights into the fundamental nature of reality and the role of consciousness in shaping the universe. However, more research is necessary to fully explore the potential impact of this concept.

Similar threads

Replies
5
Views
752
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
9
Views
784
Replies
4
Views
848
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
905
Replies
1
Views
523
  • Quantum Physics
3
Replies
87
Views
5K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
15
Views
2K
Back
Top