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Importance of words vs importance of talent

  1. Feb 22, 2006 #1
    I'm gonna ask a personal question. But wouldn't suprise me as also a classical philosophical question. And which I thus also really believe others have benefit from also. I'll also ask it through 'I' form, through me, so to to deliberately make it more alive. It has a general philosophical side, and a personal psyociological side.

    The question is a question I've had quite a lot of trouble with recently. How should I balance the importance of words vs importance of talent? Me, I'm more good at math and general activeness, than words, which often come up to me as dazy evil little men dressed in clowns h.. But I believe that words describe much more than math do. Words is pictures+structure at once so to speak. I really believe in words, bringing us toward understanding and gladly to intelligence too. Although us is more important of course. I also believe in amaterialism, that I should as far as possible, or in the long run, go towards the living, and sort of what moves. And not extension, things.
    Sure, as with very many other men, activeness in certain things in early childhood has made made me more into structure and practical things. But I think that I still make my memories, I still evolve, and maybe I can create talent? This is also a personal psyciological question.

    Can anyone clear up this mess so to speak? Bring in other forgotten factors? Set up a diagram? It would be really appreciated!
    I'm sure this is a question very many boys in the world today is asking themselves. Surely it must be one of those classic philosophical questions, so maybe some here also have this insight to enlighten us with.
    What should I/we choose? Why?
    Should I choose struggle with words in a say 3 year old philosophics course, but which I believe bring more goodness in general, and richness to myself(in soul). Or should I choose the slighter easier path with maths, or practical jobs, which I believe to be actually more honorable, since that is more needed today. A dilemma.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 22, 2006 #2
    Talent can go unpropegated and unobserved without the ability to convey the message, but there is an underlying sense of knowldge. Whereas one with the ability to convey messages well can be believed without any basis behind said satements.
     
  4. Feb 22, 2006 #3
    I say go for the maths and practical stuff. If you're interested in philosophy you need to be careful that it doesn't just turn into arguing about the meaning of words. And 'true' philosophy would probably be better reached by getting experience of something else.
     
  5. Mar 27, 2006 #4
    Something about your question interested me, i wonder if you'd mind explaining?

    You refer to men being drawn to practical things, was that simpley a personal statement or do you think that women are somehow different in this regard?

    As to answering your question, i would suggest that you study the maths as, clearly, you are capeable of thinking about philosophy yourself, you do not need a degree to do this! Furthermore, if you have difficulty with your expression and language you are at a great disadvantage in a philosophy degree, which is assessed mostly through essays and such.
     
  6. Mar 27, 2006 #5
    What should I/we choose? Why?
    Should I choose struggle with words in a say 3 year old philosophics course, but which I believe bring more goodness in general, and richness to myself(in soul). Or should I choose the slighter easier path with maths, or practical jobs, which I believe to be actually more honorable, since that is more needed today. A dilemma.
    - pace

    if i paraphrase .. would i do more good as Bill Gates or as a budhist monk? is that what you are asking pace?

    obviously theres huge issue with good~goodness, but we could simplify a little or take a shortcut i think. to answer this question we should adopt a questionable premise and ask another question. the permise is: to impose on others is bad, and the question is: what it takes to become and be Bill Gates and what it takes to become and be a budhist monk? taken to such extremes i think the answer to the dilema is somewhat clearer* than in your case .. math vs philsophy.

    in conslusion, personally i dont think it matters all that much in your case, though i tend to agree with the FatManWalking who says: Cure the mind and the ass will follow!

    then again, only you are to be your own judge..

    *is it really?
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2006
  7. Mar 27, 2006 #6
    Three old quotes that might help with your stated predicament:

    "The pen is mighter than the sword"

    (but)

    "Actions speak loader than words"

    (but)

    "It ain't what you do its the way that you do it"

    I'll leave all the decifering and translation of these wise tid bits up to you!
     
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